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I'm having a hard time figuring out why GCC 4.5 won't let me compile this:

#include <iostream>
#include <bitset>

#define WIDTH 512
#define HEIGHT 512

#define CEIL_POS(X) ((X - (unsigned int)(X)) > 0 ? (unsigned int)(X + 1) : (unsigned int)(X))

int main ()
{
    const unsigned int length = static_cast<const unsigned int>(CEIL_POS(static_cast<float>(WIDTH * HEIGHT) / 8.0));

    std::bitset<length> bits;

    return 0;
}

It works just fine in VS2010. What am I missing?

UPDATE: I was in a hurry and I didn't paste the entire code. Sorry about that :(

PS: Just as the title says, the error that I receive is: "length cannot appear in a constant-expression."

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1  
what's the compiler message? –  stefan Aug 19 '12 at 21:59
2  
Copy and pasted into ideone(gcc 4.5.1) I get no errors. –  Jesse Good Aug 19 '12 at 21:59
2  
does replacing X by (X) in the macro change anything? –  stefan Aug 19 '12 at 22:06
    
@stefan i had the same idea, although i thought about adding the paranteses in the call and not in the definition –  Paranaix Aug 19 '12 at 22:12
    
it's working with gcc 4.6.3 too. compiler message and flags really would help here.. –  stefan Aug 19 '12 at 22:15
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know whether the problem you're having is caused by a bug in the compiler, or if that is expected behavior, but simply removing the static_cast to float seems to solve the problem, and results in the exact same value.

#include <iostream>
#include <bitset>

#define WIDTH 512
#define HEIGHT 512

#define CEIL_POS(X) ((X - (unsigned int)(X)) > 0 ? (unsigned int)(X + 1) : (unsigned int)(X))

int main ()
{
    const unsigned int length_1 = static_cast<const unsigned int>(CEIL_POS(static_cast<float>(WIDTH * HEIGHT) / 8.0));
    const unsigned int length_2 = static_cast<const unsigned int>(CEIL_POS(WIDTH * HEIGHT / 8.0));

    std::cout << length_1 << '\n' << length_2 << '\n';
    if (length_1 == length_2)
        std::cout << "They are exactly the same.";

    std::bitset<length_2> bits;
}
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doesn't work for me with gcc 4.6.3 –  stefan Aug 19 '12 at 22:53
    
@stefan: What options are you using? I'm on 4.6.1 with -Wall -Werror -pedantic-errors and it compiles fine. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 19 '12 at 22:57
    
@BenjaminLindley For some reason, I was under the impression that the outcome of the division would be an int if the first operand is an int. Now it's working just fine. Thanks a million! –  Mihai Todor Aug 19 '12 at 22:57
    
I just copy pasted this to have a double check. I'm using the exact same code and the exact same flags. It's 4.6.3 on Ubuntu 32bit. This is very strange but luckily it solves the problem of the OP.. –  stefan Aug 19 '12 at 23:01
1  
I've started a new question stackoverflow.com/questions/12030885/… with a reduced example and adressing the compiler flags –  stefan Aug 19 '12 at 23:47
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