Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have studied the theory of the merge sort but don't have any idea of how to implement it in C++. My question is, merge sort creates arrays in recursion. But when implementing, how do we create arrays in realtime ? or what is the general approach for this?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Actually, the advantage of merge sort is that it doesn't need arrays in the first place. In fact, merge sort can be implemented in-place, using sequences with rather low requirements (I'd think you can implement it on forward iterators). Have a look at std::merge_sort()! –  Dietmar Kühl Aug 19 '12 at 23:09
    
"Runtime", not "realtime". –  Kerrek SB Aug 19 '12 at 23:10
    
@DietmarKühl: What is std::merge_sort? Do you perhaps mean std::stable_sort? –  Blastfurnace Aug 19 '12 at 23:18
    
3  
@DietmarKühl: There is a std::inplace_merge algorithm that I've used to implement merge sort. –  Blastfurnace Aug 19 '12 at 23:29

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted
// Merge Sort

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int a[50];
void merge(int,int,int);
void merge_sort(int low,int high)
{
 int mid;
 if(low<high)
 {
  mid = low + (high-low)/2; //This avoids overflow when low, high are too large
  merge_sort(low,mid);
  merge_sort(mid+1,high);
  merge(low,mid,high);
 }
}
void merge(int low,int mid,int high)
{
 int h,i,j,b[50],k;
 h=low;
 i=low;
 j=mid+1;

 while((h<=mid)&&(j<=high))
 {
  if(a[h]<=a[j])
  {
   b[i]=a[h];
   h++;
  }
  else
  {
   b[i]=a[j];
   j++;
  }
  i++;
 }
 if(h>mid)
 {
  for(k=j;k<=high;k++)
  {
   b[i]=a[k];
   i++;
  }
 }
 else
 {
  for(k=h;k<=mid;k++)
  {
   b[i]=a[k];
   i++;
  }
 }
 for(k=low;k<=high;k++) a[k]=b[k];
}
int main()
{
 int num,i;

cout<<"*******************************************************************
*************"<<endl;
 cout<<"                             MERGE SORT PROGRAM
"<<endl;

cout<<"*******************************************************************
*************"<<endl;
 cout<<endl<<endl;
 cout<<"Please Enter THE NUMBER OF ELEMENTS you want to sort [THEN 
PRESS
ENTER]:"<<endl;
 cin>>num;
 cout<<endl;
 cout<<"Now, Please Enter the ( "<< num <<" ) numbers (ELEMENTS) [THEN
PRESS ENTER]:"<<endl;
 for(i=1;i<=num;i++)
 {
  cin>>a[i] ;
 }
 merge_sort(1,num);
 cout<<endl;
 cout<<"So, the sorted list (using MERGE SORT) will be :"<<endl;
 cout<<endl<<endl;

 for(i=1;i<=num;i++)
 cout<<a[i]<<"  ";

 cout<<endl<<endl<<endl<<endl;
return 1;

}
share|improve this answer
6  
<iostream.h>?!?! Surely, you are kidding! This header went out of use more than a decade ago! Not to mention the use of a global variable and main() returning void. Whatever is the source of this information, it is probably best left alone...! –  Dietmar Kühl Aug 19 '12 at 23:14
3  
You are right, for sure. But guy asked about arrays and recursion. You have it here. And you can find the source in my answer. –  klm123 Aug 19 '12 at 23:16
2  
But I fixed iostream and main:) –  klm123 Aug 19 '12 at 23:17
    
Well, merge sort is clearly recursive. However, it definitely doesn't need arrays. It doesn't need any extra memory either although in-place merging isn't entirely trivial (I think; what I could come up immediately is reasonably easy but not a simple loop). –  Dietmar Kühl Aug 19 '12 at 23:19
1  
@kim123: Of course, just removing .h isn't sufficient because now the code doesn't compiles! You'd need a using namesspace std; directive. –  Dietmar Kühl Aug 19 '12 at 23:21

To answer the question: Creating dynamically sized arrays at run-time is done using std::vector<T>. Ideally, you'd get your input using one of these. If not, it is easy to convert them. For example, you could create two arrays like this:

template <typename T>
void merge_sort(std::vector<T>& array) {
    if (1 < array.size()) {
        std::vector<T> array1(array.begin(), array.begin() + array.size() / 2);
        merge_sort(array1);
        std::vector<T> array2(array.begin() + array.size() / 2, array.end());
        merge_sort(array2);
        merge(array, array1, array2);
    }
}

However, allocating dynamic arrays is relatively slow and generally should be avoided when possible. For merge sort you can just sort subsequences of the original array and in-place merge them. It seems, std::inplace_merge() asks for bidirectional iterators.

share|improve this answer

I've rearranged the selected answer, used pointers for arrays and user input for number count is not pre-defined.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void merge(int*, int*, int, int, int);

void mergesort(int *a, int*b, int start, int end) {
  int halfpoint;
  if (start < end) {
    halfpoint = (start + end) / 2;
    mergesort(a, b, start, halfpoint);
    mergesort(a, b, halfpoint + 1, end);
    merge(a, b, start, halfpoint, end);
  }
}

void merge(int *a, int *b, int start, int halfpoint, int end) {
  int h, i, j, k;
  h = start;
  i = start;
  j = halfpoint + 1;

  while ((h <= halfpoint) && (j <= end)) {
    if (a[h] <= a[j]) {
      b[i] = a[h];
      h++;
    } else {
      b[i] = a[j];
      j++;
    }
    i++;
  }
  if (h > halfpoint) {
    for (k = j; k <= end; k++) {
      b[i] = a[k];
      i++;
    }
  } else {
    for (k = h; k <= halfpoint; k++) {
      b[i] = a[k];
      i++;
    }
  }

  // Write the final sorted array to our original one
  for (k = start; k <= end; k++) {
    a[k] = b[k];
  }
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  int num;
  cout << "How many numbers do you want to sort: ";
  cin >> num;
  int a[num];
  int b[num];
  for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
    cout << (i + 1) << ": ";
    cin >> a[i];
  }

  // Start merge sort
  mergesort(a, b, 0, num - 1);

  // Print the sorted array
  cout << endl;
  for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
    cout << a[i] << " ";
  }
  cout << endl;

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

I have completed @DietmarKühl s way of merge sort. Hope it helps all.

template <typename T>
void merge(vector<T>& array, vector<T>& array1, vector<T>& array2) {
    array.clear();

    int i, j, k;
    for( i = 0, j = 0, k = 0; i < array1.size() && j < array2.size(); k++){
        if(array1.at(i) <= array2.at(j)){
            array.push_back(array1.at(i));
            i++;
        }else if(array1.at(i) > array2.at(j)){
            array.push_back(array2.at(j));
            j++;
        }
        k++;
    }

    while(i < array1.size()){
        array.push_back(array1.at(i));
        i++;
    }

    while(j < array2.size()){
        array.push_back(array2.at(j));
        j++;
    }
}

template <typename T>
void merge_sort(std::vector<T>& array) {
    if (1 < array.size()) {
        std::vector<T> array1(array.begin(), array.begin() + array.size() / 2);
        merge_sort(array1);
        std::vector<T> array2(array.begin() + array.size() / 2, array.end());
        merge_sort(array2);
        merge(array, array1, array2);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I know this question has already been answered, but I decided to add my two cents. Here is code for a merge sort that only uses additional space in the merge operation (and that additional space is temporary space which will be destroyed when the stack is popped). In fact, you will see in this code that there is not usage of heap operations (no declaring new anywhere).

Hope this helps.

    void merge(int *arr, int size1, int size2) {
        int temp[size1+size2];
        int ptr1=0, ptr2=0;
        int *arr1 = arr, *arr2 = arr+size1;

        while (ptr1+ptr2 < size1+size2) {
            if (ptr1 < size1 && arr1[ptr1] <= arr2[ptr2] || ptr1 < size1 && ptr2 >= size2)
                temp[ptr1+ptr2] = arr1[ptr1++];

            if (ptr2 < size2 && arr2[ptr2] < arr1[ptr1] || ptr2 < size2 && ptr1 >= size1)
                temp[ptr1+ptr2] = arr2[ptr2++];
        }   

        for (int i=0; i < size1+size2; i++)
            arr[i] = temp[i];
    }   

    void mergeSort(int *arr, int size) {
        if (size == 1)
            return;

        int size1 = size/2, size2 = size-size1;
        mergeSort(arr, size1);
        mergeSort(arr+size1, size2);
        merge(arr, size1, size2);
    } 

    int main(int argc, char** argv) {
         int num;
         cout << "How many numbers do you want to sort: ";
         cin >> num;
         int a[num];
         for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
           cout << (i + 1) << ": ";
           cin >> a[i];
         }   

         // Start merge sort
         mergeSort(a, num);

         // Print the sorted array
         cout << endl;
         for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
           cout << a[i] << " ";
         }   
         cout << endl;

         return 0;
    } 
share|improve this answer
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
void merge_sort(T array[],int beg, int end){
    if (beg==end){
        return;
    }
    int mid = (beg+end)/2;
    merge_sort(array,beg,mid);
    merge_sort(array,mid+1,end);
    int i=beg,j=mid+1;
    int l=end-beg+1;
    T *temp = new T [l];
    for (int k=0;k<l;k++){
        if (j>end || (i<=mid && array[i]<array[j])){
            temp[k]=array[i];
            i++;
        }
        else{
            temp[k]=array[j];
            j++;
        }
    }
    for (int k=0,i=beg;k<l;k++,i++){
        array[i]=temp[k];
    }
    delete temp;
}

int main() {
    float array[] = {1000.5,1.2,3.4,2,9,4,3,2.3,0,-5};
    int l = sizeof(array)/sizeof(array[0]);
    merge_sort(array,0,l-1);
    cout << "Result:\n";
    for (int k=0;k<l;k++){
        cout << array[k] << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a way to implement it, using just arrays.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

//The merge function
void merge(int a[], int startIndex, int endIndex)
{

int size = (endIndex - startIndex) + 1;
int *b = new int [size]();

int i = startIndex;
int mid = (startIndex + endIndex)/2;
int k = 0;
int j = mid + 1;

while (k < size)
{   
    if((i<=mid) && (a[i] < a[j]))
    {
        b[k++] = a[i++];
    }
    else
    {
        b[k++] = a[j++];
    }

}

for(k=0; k < size; k++)
{
    a[startIndex+k] = b[k];
}

delete []b;

}

//The recursive merge sort function
void merge_sort(int iArray[], int startIndex, int endIndex)
{
int midIndex;

//Check for base case
if (startIndex >= endIndex)
{
    return;
}   

//First, divide in half
midIndex = (startIndex + endIndex)/2;

//First recursive call 
merge_sort(iArray, startIndex, midIndex);

//Second recursive call 
merge_sort(iArray, midIndex+1, endIndex);

merge(iArray, startIndex, endIndex);

}



//The main function
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
int iArray[10] = {2,5,6,4,7,2,8,3,9,10};

merge_sort(iArray, 0, 9);

//Print the sorted array
for(int i=0; i < 10; i++)
{
    cout << iArray[i] << endl;
}

return 0;    
}
share|improve this answer

I wrote it using libraries..

#include<vector.h>
#include<iterator.h>
using namespace std;
vector<int> arr;
void mergesort(int,int);
vector<int>::iterator iter;
int main()
{
    //fill out values in the vector by push_back()
    mergesort(0,arr.size()-1);
}
void mergesort(int lo,int hi)
{
    if(lo<hi)
    {
        int mid=(hi+lo)/2;
        mergesort(lo,mid);
        mergesort(mid+1,hi);
        inplace_merge(arr.begin()+lo,arr.begin()+mid+1,arr.begin()+hi+1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
arr.begin()+lo points to the begning element ....................... arr.begin()+mid+1 points to the middle ....................... arr.begin()+hi+1 points to the last element –  Vishal Sep 14 '14 at 13:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.