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I haven't done much with global and I was wondering how I can make the functions and variables inside a class global. I was trying to test global between classes using fonts and functions. If anyone can point out where i am going wrong, it would be very helpful.

Global.py

#Fonts
#Common Functions
import tkFont

class Global():
    def __init__(self):
        global f,f1,f2,enter,leave
        f = tkFont.Font(name='f',size=14, weight='bold')
        f1 = tkFont.Font(name='f1',size=12, weight='bold')
        f2 = tkFont.Font(name='f2', underline=True,size=12, weight='bold')

    def enter(self,event):
            event.widget.config(font='f2')
    def leave(self,event):
            event.widget.config(font='f1')

LoginFrame.py

from Tkinter import *
from Global import *

class LoginFrame(Frame):
    def __init__(self,master):
        self.master=master
        Global()

    def createWidgets(self):
        self.frame = Frame(self.master,bg='black',width=800,height=500,bd=5,relief=GROOVE)
        self.user_lbl = Label(self.frame, text='User', bg='black', fg='white',font='f1')
        self.user_lbl.bind('<Enter>',enter), self.user_lbl.bind('<Leave>',leave)

        self.pw_lbl = Label(self.frame, text='Password', bg='black', fg='white',font='f2')
        self.pw_lbl.bind('<Enter>',enter), self.pw_lbl.bind('<Leave>',leave)

    def packWidgets(self):
        self.frame.grid_propagate(0), self.frame.grid(row=1)
        self.user_lbl.grid(row=2,column=1,sticky=W)
        self.pw_lbl.grid(row=4,column=1,sticky=W)


root=Tk()
loginFrame=LoginFrame(root)
loginFrame.createWidgets()
loginFrame.packWidgets()
root.mainloop()
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What is your question? You just posted some code without saying what you want it to do. Give a specific example of what you are trying to achieve. –  BrenBarn Aug 19 '12 at 23:55
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In this code

def __init__(self,master):
    self.master=master
    Global()

Global() is just created and not assigned. Global's __init__ calls

global f,f1,f2,enter,leave

But this defines the scope, not a 'global variable'.

One option is to do the following

class Globals():
    f = tkFont.Font(name='f',size=14, weight='bold')
    f1 = tkFont.Font(name='f1',size=12, weight='bold')
    f2 = tkFont.Font(name='f2', underline=True,size=12, weight='bold')

or simply define them by themselves

 f = tkFont.Font(name='f',size=14, weight='bold')
 f1 = tkFont.Font(name='f1',size=12, weight='bold')
 f2 = tkFont.Font(name='f2', underline=True,size=12, weight='bold')

and then use globals in your function. You don't need the keyword global unless you are making an assignment

self.pw_lbl = Label(...,f)
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Are you basically just telling OP not to use global? –  Marcin Aug 20 '12 at 0:11
    
@Marcin - no, I'm commenting that it's odd to have a Globals class that also uses the globals keyword, much like you did and to demonstrate that he can use class-level variables within a class if he wants to organize them there. If there's a reason to define constant-like globals from within a class (e.g., on initialization), I don't know it. –  dfb Aug 20 '12 at 1:48
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I haven't done much with global and I was wondering how I can make the functions and variables inside a class global.

You can't. Inside a method, you can declare a variable as global, and assignments to it will be to the global variable.

There isn't any other level of globalness.

Of course, you wouldn't want to do this, because the point of classes is to avoid global state, and to keep shared state encapsulated.

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