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I'm building a plugin with the code below. If I change $(opts.section, this).animate to $(opts.section).animate it works as I want it too, but it animates all instances of the section element, and I want it to only affect this current one. Once I add "this" to it, it stops working all together.

  $('.next', this).on({
    click: function() {
      if(count+2 <= totalElems) {
        count += 1;
        currentAnimationSpot += singleElem + opts.offset;
        $(opts.section, this).animate({
          left: -currentAnimationSpot
        });
      }
    }
  });

  $('.prev', this).on({
    click: function(){
      if(count != 1) {
        count-=1;
        currentAnimationSpot -= singleElem + opts.offset;
        $(opts.section, this).animate({
          left: -currentAnimationSpot
        });
      }
    }
  });  
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2  
that suggests to me that the this inside your anonymous functions refers to something different than the this outside your function. what happens if you do something like: var self=this outside your function and reference self instead? –  Jeff Tratner Aug 20 '12 at 0:05
    
Wow it worked! I've been trying to figure this out for hours. I still don't understand why it doesn't work, with this? If you answer the question I'll award you the answer. –  Ian Hoar Aug 20 '12 at 0:07
2  
In $('.next', this), this is the context (ancestor) of the .next which you're binding the handler to. Inside the handler, this references the element that triggered the handler, the .next element. There's a lot of material on SO about closures/scopes and this. =] –  Fabrício Matté Aug 20 '12 at 0:11
    
@FabrícioMatté, do you have a favorite answer on closures/scopes? It'd be great to have a link to share when I want to explain the concept :) –  Jeff Tratner Aug 20 '12 at 0:25
1  
Closures and variable scope in general are very well explained here (the first most upvoted answers are slightly harder to understand, so you may start reading some simpler answers below those), now I've been looking for some specific material on the this scope, check this answer. –  Fabrício Matté Aug 20 '12 at 0:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The this inside the function is different than the this outside your function. EDIT: as @FabricioMatte's answer says -" this in the scope of your $(".next", this) handler references the element that triggered the handler".

So, you need to store the outer this in a separate variable so you can access it inside your function. E.g.

var self=this;

$('.prev', this).on({
    click: function(){
      if(count != 1) {
        count-=1;
        currentAnimationSpot -= singleElem + opts.offset;
        // now use self here
        $(opts.section, self).animate({
          left: -currentAnimationSpot
        });
      }
    }
  });

Even though this might seem strange at first, it's actually the same behavior you'd see any time you assign a new value in the local scope of a function, it's just that the this assignment is hidden.

Quick example of closures/scoping: Say you have a variable scoped, you could replicate the behavior as follows:

var scoped = "Outer scope!";
var saved = scoped;

myfn() {
    var scoped = "Inner scope!";
    console.log("Inner `scoped` is " + scoped); // Inner `scoped` is Inner scope!
    console.log("Inner `saved` is " + saved);  // Inner `saved`` is Outer scope!
};

console.log("Outer scoped is: " + scoped); // Outer scope!
console.log("Outer saved is: " + saved); // Outer scope!
myfn();

Just imagine you replaced "scoped" with "this" and you should get the general idea (it's as if someone set var this = triggerElement inside the scope of the function.

share|improve this answer
    
opinionated side note: this is why I like that Python has you explicitly include self as a parameter to methods -- it lets you be very explicit and clear about where each variable comes from, instead of the (very minimal magic of the changing this) –  Jeff Tratner Aug 20 '12 at 0:21
    
Thanks for the awesome explanation. –  Ian Hoar Aug 20 '12 at 0:23

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