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I'm in a situation where I need to create a bunch of fake datasets where the sum of two variables is the same as in my real data, but the counts for each variable are random. Here's the setup:

>df
    X.1  X.2
1   145   30
2    55   73   

The first row sums to 175, and the second to 128. What I'm looking for is a way to generate a data frame (or a bunch of data frames) like this:

>df.2
    X.1  X.2
1   100   75
2    90   38

In df.2, the cell counts have changed, but the rows still sum to the same table. The actual data has hundreds of rows, but only two variables if that helps. I've tried to figure out how to do this with sample() but haven't had any luck. Any suggestions?

Thanks!

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2  
You are sampling from a multinomial distribution, so rmultinom is what you want. Are the probabilities supposed to be equal for each cell? –  mnel Aug 20 '12 at 0:30
    
Well, ideally it would be great if I could get the cell counts to be normally distributed with a mean of the "true" cell count. –  user1202761 Aug 20 '12 at 1:04
    
Are you sure you mean Normally distributed. The multinomial distribution will ensure that the cell counts are poisson (conditional on the sum), but I don't think normal makes any sense, I've edited the answer to show how to do this. –  mnel Aug 20 '12 at 1:07
    
Yes, you're right, poisson is more appropriate given the nature of the count. Thanks for catching that. Any way to make it generalizable to any number of rows, as in @thelatemail's answer? –  user1202761 Aug 20 '12 at 1:17
    
Yes! see the edited answer –  mnel Aug 20 '12 at 1:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are sampling from a multinomial distribution,


edit

to allow for prespecified expected cell counts

  • The multinomial distribution can be considered each cell as Poisson distribution (with expected cell count), conditional on the sum.

EDIT 2

  • allow for any number of rows / expected cell counts
  • pass expected as the expected cell counts

note that rmultinom returns a matrix where each column is a multinomial sample, hence my use of t to create a single row matrix

replicates <- 10
expected <- data.frame(X1  = c(100,90,30),X2 = c(75,28,120))
##    X1  X2
## 1 100  75
## 2  90  28
## 3  30 120
data_samples <- lapply(seq(replicates), function(i, expected){
   # create a list of expected cell counts (list element = row of expected)
  .list <- lapply(apply(expected,1,list),unlist)
   # sample from these expected cell counts and recombine into a data.frame
   as.data.frame(do.call(rbind,lapply(.list, function(.x) t(rmultinom(n = 1, prob = .x,  size = sum(.x) )))))
   }, expected = expected)

This creates a list of data.frames with the appropriate properties

data_samples[[1]]
##    X1  X2
## 1 104  71
## 2  84  34
## 3  19 131


data_samples[[5]]
##   X1  X2
## 1 88  87
## 2 92  26
## 3 27 123
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Yep, that works! Thanks so much! –  user1202761 Aug 20 '12 at 1:44

Perhaps you're looking for r2dtable?

> r2dtable(2, c(175,128), c(190, 113))
[[1]]
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]  108   67
[2,]   82   46

[[2]]
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]  114   61
[2,]   76   52

Also, here's a version of @mnel's answer that uses rmultinom to do the n replicates and then combines the results. Not that it really matters if you only need a few replicates, but since rmultinom could do it, I thought I'd see how it might be done.

n <- 10
e <- cbind(X1  = c(100,90,30),X2 = c(75,28,120))
aperm(array(sapply(1:nrow(e), function(i) 
        rmultinom(n, rowSums(e)[i], (e/rowSums(e))[i,])),
      dim=c(ncol(e),n,nrow(e))), c(3,1,2))
share|improve this answer
    
+ 1 , so simple., although it is not clear that the OP wants the column sums to be consistent. –  mnel Aug 20 '12 at 2:12
    
Although this function requires specifying both a desired row and column sum. –  thelatemail Aug 20 '12 at 2:21
    
Column sum need not be the same, but that's actually a very nifty solution. –  user1202761 Aug 20 '12 at 2:50
    
Given that you don't want the column sums to be the same, this approach might be nifty, but it is not correct. –  mnel Aug 20 '12 at 4:41
1  
You are all right that this also makes the column sums the same, which the OP did not require. I do wonder what the OP is doing and which is really appropriate, but that would be a question for stats.stackexchange. –  Aaron Aug 20 '12 at 11:50

Data for use in answers:

test <- data.frame(X.1=c(145,55),X.2=c(30,73))

A version using sample:

t(sapply(
        rowSums(test),
        function(x) {
                one <- sample(1:x,1)
                two <- (x - one)
                result <- data.frame(one,two)
                names(result) <- names(test)
                return(result)
                }
         )
)

Results look like:

     X.1 X.2
[1,] 20  155
[2,] 127 1  

or...

     X.1 X.2
[1,] 111 64 
[2,] 94  34 

etc...

Alternatively:

Just add a bit of jitter to one of the numbers first then subtract this from the row sum.

t(apply(
        test,
        1,
        function(x) {
                rsum <- sum(x)
                one <- round(jitter(x[1],20,20),0)
                two <- (rsum - one)
                result <- c(one,two)
                names(result) <- names(test)
                return(result)
                }
    )
)

Result examples:

     X.1 X.2
[1,] 160  15
[2,]  47  81

     X.1 X.2
[1,] 127  48
[2,]  64  64
share|improve this answer
    
I do like the fact that this is generalizable to any number of rows, but it's not quite as flexible as the other answer –  user1202761 Aug 20 '12 at 1:13

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