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I am not really proficient in Haskell, so it might be a very easy question.

What language limitation do Rank2Types solve?
Do not functions in Haskell already support polymorphic arguments?

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Do not functions in Haskell already support polymorphic arguments?

They do, but only of rank 1. This means that while you can write a function that takes different types of arguments without this extension, you can't write a function that uses its argument as different types in the same invocation.

For example the following function can't be typed without this extension because g is used with different argument types in the definition of f:

f g = g 1 + g "lala"

Note that it's perfectly possible to pass a polymorphic function as an argument to another function. So something like map id ["a","b","c"] is perfectly legal. But the function may only use it as monomorphic. In the example map uses id as if it had type String -> String. And of course you can also pass a simple monomorphic function of the given type instead of id. Without rank2types there is no way for a function to require that its argument must be a polymorphic function and thus also no way to use it as a polymorphic function.

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I see, thanks. Good example. I assumed it was supported, that's why I had a problem understanding it. I will accept in 5 mins (SO limitation). –  Andrey Shchekin Aug 20 '12 at 3:16
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To add some words connecting my answer to this one: consider the Haskell function f' g x y = g x + g y. Its inferred rank-1 type is forall a r. Num r => (a -> r) -> a -> a -> r. Since forall a is outside the function arrows, the caller must first pick a type for a; if they pick Int, we get f' :: forall r. Num r => (Int -> r) -> Int -> Int -> r, and now we have fixed the g argument so it can take Int but not String. If we enable RankNTypes we can annotate f' with type forall b c r. Num r => (forall a. a -> r) -> b -> c -> r. Can't use it, though—what would g be? –  Luis Casillas Aug 31 '12 at 0:34
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It's hard to understand higher-rank polymorphism unless you study System F directly, because Haskell is designed to hide the details of that from you in the interest of simplicity.

But basically, the rough idea is that polymorphic types don't really have the a -> b form that they do in Haskell; in reality, they look like this, always with explicit quantifiers:

id :: ∀a.a → a
id = Λt.λx:t.x

If you don't know the "∀" symbol, it's read as "for all"; ∀x.dog(x) means "for all x, x is a dog." "Λ" is capital lambda, used for abstracting over type parameters; what the second line says is that id is a function that takes a type t, and then returns a function that's parametrized by that type.

You see, in System F, you can't just apply a function like that id to a value right away; first you need to apply the Λ-function to a type in order to get a λ-function that you apply to a value. So for example:

(Λt.λx:t.x) Int 5 = (λx:Int.x) 5
                  = 5

Standard Haskell (i.e., Haskell 98 and 2010) simplifies this for you by not having any of these type quantifiers, capital lambdas and type applications, but behind the scenes GHC puts them in when it analyzes the program for compilation. (This is all compile-time stuff, I believe, with no runtime overhead.)

But Haskell's automatic handling of this means that it assumes that "∀" never appears on the left-hand branch of a function ("→") type. Rank2Types and RankNTypes turn off those restrictions and allow you to override Haskell's default rules for where to insert forall.

Why would you want to do this? Because the full, unrestricted System F is hella powerful, and it can do a lot of cool stuff. For example, type hiding and modularity can be implemented using higher-rank types. Take for example a plain old function of the following rank-1 type (to set the scene):

f :: ∀r.∀a.((a → r) → a → r) → r

To use f, the caller first must choose what types to use for r and a, then supply an argument of the resulting type. So you could pick r = Int and a = String:

f Int String :: ((String → Int) → String → Int) → Int

But now compare that to the following higher-rank type:

f' :: ∀r.(∀a.(a → r) → a → r) → r

How does a function of this type work? Well, to use it, first you specify which type to use for r. Say we pick Int:

f' Int :: (∀a.(a → Int) → a → Int) → Int

But now the ∀a is inside the function arrow, so you can't pick what type to use for a; you must apply f' Int to a Λ-function of the appropriate type. This means that the implementation of f' gets to pick what type to use for a, not the caller of f'. Without higher-rank types, on the contrary, the caller always picks the types.

What is this useful for? Well, for many things actually, but one idea is that you can use this to model things like object-oriented programming, where "objects" bundle some hidden data together with some methods that work on the hidden data. So for example, an object with two methods—one that returns an Int and another that returns a String, could be implemented with this type:

myObject :: ∀r.(∀a.(a → Int, a -> String) → a → r) → r

How does this work? The object is implemented as a function that has some internal data of hidden type a. To actually use the object, its clients pass in a "callback" function that the object will call with the two methods. For example:

myObject String (Λa. λ(length, name):(a → Int, a → String). λobjData:a. name objData)

Here we are, basically, invoking the object's second method, the one whose type is a → String for an unknown a. Well, unknown to myObject's clients; but these clients do know, from the signature, that they will be able to apply either of the two functions to it, and get either an Int or a String.

For an actual Haskell example, below is the code that I wrote when I taught myself RankNTypes. This implements a type called ShowBox which bundles together a value of some hidden type together with its Show class instance. Note that in the example at the bottom, I make a list of ShowBox whose first element was made from a number, and the second from a string. Since the types are hidden by using the higher-rank types, this doesn't violate type checking.

{-# LANGUAGE RankNTypes #-}
{-# LANGUAGE ImpredicativeTypes #-}

type ShowBox = forall b. (forall a. Show a => a -> b) -> b

mkShowBox :: Show a => a -> ShowBox
mkShowBox x = \k -> k x

-- | This is the key function for using a 'ShowBox'.  You pass in
-- a function @k@ that will be applied to the contents of the 
-- ShowBox.  But you don't pick the type of @k@'s argument--the 
-- ShowBox does.  However, it's restricted to picking a type that
-- implements @Show@, so you know that whatever type it picks, you
-- can use the 'show' function.
runShowBox :: forall b. (forall a. Show a => a -> b) -> ShowBox -> b
-- Expanded type:
--
--     runShowBox 
--         :: forall b. (forall a. Show a => a -> b) 
--                   -> (forall b. (forall a. Show a => a -> b) -> b)
--                   -> b
--
runShowBox k box = box k


example :: [ShowBox] 
-- example :: [ShowBox] expands to this:
--
--     example :: [forall b. (forall a. Show a => a -> b) -> b]
--
-- Without the annotation the compiler infers the following, which
-- breaks in the definition of 'result' below:
--
--     example :: forall b. [(forall a. Show a => a -> b) -> b]
--
example = [mkShowBox 5, mkShowBox "foo"]

result :: [String]
result = map (runShowBox show) example

PS: for anybody reading this who's wondered how come ExistentialTypes in GHC uses forall, I believe the reason is because it's using this sort of technique behind the scenes.

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Thanks for a very elaborate answer! (which, incidentally, also finally motivated me to learn proper type theory and System F.) –  Aleksandar Dimitrov Aug 20 '12 at 7:52
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If you had exists keyword, you could define an existential type as (for example) data Any = Any (exists a. a), where Any :: (exists a. a) -> Any. Using ∀x.P(x) → Q ≡ (∃x.P(x)) → Q, we can conclude that Any could also have a type forall a. a -> Any and that's where the forall keyword comes from. I believe that existential types as implemented by GHC are just ordinary data types which also carry all the required typeclass dictionaries (I couldn't find a reference to back this up, sorry). –  Vitus Aug 20 '12 at 19:46
    
@Vitus: GHC existentials aren't tied to typeclass dictionaries. You can have data ApplyBox r = forall a. ApplyBox (a -> r) a; when you pattern match to ApplyBox f x, you get f :: h -> r and x :: h for a "hidden," restricted type h. If I understand right, the typeclass dictionary case is translated into something like this: data ShowBox = forall a. Show a => ShowBox a is translated to something like data ShowBox' = forall a. ShowBox' (ShowDict' a) a; instance Show ShowBox' where show (ShowBox' dict val) = show' dict val; show' :: ShowDict a -> a -> String. –  Luis Casillas Aug 20 '12 at 23:01
    
That is a great answer I will have to spend some time on. I think I am too used to the abstractions C# generics provide, so I was taking a lot of that for granted instead of actually understanding the theory. –  Andrey Shchekin Aug 21 '12 at 0:20
    
@sacundim: Well, "all required typeclass dictionaries" can also mean no dictionaries at all if you don't need any. :) My point was that GHC most likely doesn't encode existential types via higher ranked types (i.e. the transformation you suggest - ∃x.P(x) ~ ∀r.(∀x.P(x) → r) → r). –  Vitus Aug 21 '12 at 1:22
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Here is the link to slides from Bryan O'Sullivan's Haskell course at Stanford that helped me understand Rank2Types thingy. http://www.scs.stanford.edu/11au-cs240h/notes/laziness-slides.html

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