Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know at least the basics of piping. However, I don't understand how to implement this task in in C using C pipes. I don't know how to take the output of one program as an input to another program and so on. Eg:

ls | wc | ./add

Here ls list the files, wc gives the counts of the listed files, and ./add adds the numbers given by wc.

Please help!

EDIT: It is an assignment. The exact problem statement is given as:

"Write a C program to read the names of two (or more) executable programs, and redirect the output of the first program to the input of the second program, output of the second program to the input of the third program, and so on..."

share|improve this question
    
Not sure what you mean by "actually take the output of one program as the input to another". You want to know how to get the output of wc into your add command? –  Vaughn Cato Aug 20 '12 at 5:02
    
yes. but before that i want a wc of the ls. –  Ahor Converse Aug 20 '12 at 5:31
    
You are showing the command that does it in your question -- "ls | wc | ./add", so I'm a bit confused. –  Vaughn Cato Aug 20 '12 at 5:35
3  
Well, every | will need a pipe. To start, you make a pipe, fork, in the child dup the write end onto stdout and exec ls. Now fork again, in the child dup the read end onto stdin and exec wc. Repeat as needed :) –  Greg Inozemtsev Aug 20 '12 at 5:48
1  
@Craig Ringer. Yes, your guess is right. Its an assignment. Exact problem statement is given as "Write a C program to read the names of two (or more) executable programs, and redirect the output of the first program to the input of the second program, output of the second program to the input of the third program, and so on..." –  Ahor Converse Aug 20 '12 at 6:19
show 9 more comments

closed as not a real question by Mat, Eitan T, jonsca, Dominic Kexel, Mark Sep 23 '12 at 14:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers

When you use pipe(pipefd) to create a pipe, you get two file descriptors. Whatever is written to pipefd[1] can be read from pipefd[0]. So what you have to do is execute the first program such that its stdout is the same as pipefd[1], and execute the second program such that its stdin is the same as pipefd[0]. You use the dup()/close() trick to renumber the file descriptors just before executing the commands so that they become 0 (stdin) or 1 (stdout).

For piping together three programs, you will have two pipes. The middle program will be reading from the first one and writing to the second one.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It appears that you need to create a program that does a simple case of the shell's job: creates and executes a pipeline of commands then outputs the result.

To do this right requires you to understand SIGPIPE, child process handling, input/output redirection, file descriptors, fork() and exec(), wait(), and more.

This Linux Documentation Project article on creating pipelines should help set you on the right path.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The shell handles all the grunt work with setting up the pipes and creating processes, so you don't have to worry about that at all. From your programs point of view, this is normal input from stdin, which means you can use the normal input function such as scanf or fread from stdin.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.