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I have a big repository, around 80GB

git --version
#git version 1.7.12
git init .
#Initialized empty Git repository in /reponame/.git/
git add -A .

git commmit -m "Backup 2012-08-19 03:43:44"
#fatal: Out of memory, malloc failed (tried to allocate 32220431361 bytes)
#[master (root-commit) 8053f0d] Backup 2012-08-19 03:43:44

Why GIT need 30GB of memory for a commit?

This is not in accordance with the first paragraph of the home main home of GIT:

Git is a free and open source distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency.

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Git is designed for storing source code, but not 80 GB of source code! I'm currently using it with a repository of 120+ MB of code, and it works pretty well. –  Greg Hewgill Aug 20 '12 at 4:48
3  
What the hell are you trying to accomplish? –  origamicoder Aug 20 '12 at 4:49
    
GIT is not only for source code, also designers, binary files, "very large projects". git-scm.com/book/en/Getting-Started-About-Version-Control –  Jose Nobile Aug 20 '12 at 4:51
    
@origamicoder To versioning a folder, "big" folder. –  Jose Nobile Aug 20 '12 at 4:52
2  
try -> git config --global pack.windowMemory 256m where you can change 256 to 128 or 512 or 1024 or more depending upon what works for you. –  Avichal Badaya Aug 20 '12 at 4:58

1 Answer 1

It depends on what is in the working directory. When you did the

git add -A
git commit -m "Backup..."

You are effectively telling git to "record changes to the repository," which in freshly initialized directory of 80Gbs of things, that can be a lot of changes.

http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/git-commit.html

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You are not answering the question, The question is Why GIT commit need 30GB of memory for a commit? the question is not What is a git commit? –  Jose Nobile Aug 20 '12 at 5:00
    
Git has issues with large files. Even though they tend to show fragmented checkouts , it turns out they consider whole repository. try increasing window memory , and threads. it might work for you. –  Avichal Badaya Aug 20 '12 at 5:09

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