Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is an exact duplicate of this question, except that accepted answer is wrong, so I ask it again:

How do you correctly check to see if a given type T is an iterator?

My attempt at solving it:

// Assume enable_if and is_same are defined
// (hoping for a solution that works for C++03 too)

template<class T>
class is_iterator
{
    static char (&test(...))[2];
    template<class U>
    static typename std::enable_if<
        !std::is_same<
            typename std::iterator_traits<T>::value_type,
            void
        >::value,
        char
    >::type test(U);
public:
    static bool const value = sizeof(test(0)) == 1;
};

struct Foo { };

int main()
{
    return is_iterator<Foo>::value;
}

on Visual C++ happens to fail with:

...\vc\include\xutility(373):
error C2039: 'iterator_category': is not a member of 'Foo'

because iterator_traits is looking for a definition of value_type in Foo, which (obviously) doesn't exist.

I am aware that __if_exists is a possibility on Visual C++, but I'm looking for a portable solution.

share|improve this question
    
In addition, the linked question preceded C++11, and that has much better compile time reflection support. –  MSalters Aug 20 '12 at 9:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about something like this?

template<typename T, typename = void>
struct is_iterator
{
   static constexpr bool value = false;
};

template<typename T>
struct is_iterator<T, typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<typename std::iterator_traits<T>::value_type, void>::value>::type>
{
   static constexpr bool value = true;
};

example:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <vector>

template<typename T, typename = void>
struct is_iterator
{
   static constexpr bool value = false;
};

template<typename T>
struct is_iterator<T, typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<typename std::iterator_traits<T>::value_type, void>::value>::type>
{
   static constexpr bool value = true;
};

int main()
{
   static_assert(!is_iterator<int>::value, "ass");
   static_assert(is_iterator<int*>::value, "ass");
   static_assert(is_iterator<std::vector<int>::iterator>::value, "ass");
}

http://liveworkspace.org/code/7dcf96c97fd0b7a69f12658fc7b2693e

share|improve this answer
    
Try it with a random struct like Foo (I tried it on Visual C++). Same problem as mine. –  Mehrdad Aug 20 '12 at 6:10
    
1  
Visual Studio's rules are not the most similar. You will have to produce something compiler-specific. –  Puppy Aug 20 '12 at 6:12
    
Well, it does fail on Visual C++, so either the compiler or this is wrong... –  Mehrdad Aug 20 '12 at 6:12
    
@DeadMG: Do you mean it's a bug? or that there's no portable way to do it? –  Mehrdad Aug 20 '12 at 6:12

I implemented this one some time ago:

template <typename T>
struct is_iterator {  
    template <typename U>
    static char test(typename std::iterator_traits<U>::pointer* x);

    template <typename U>
    static long test(U* x);

    static const bool value = sizeof(test<T>(nullptr)) == 1;
};

It compiles fine using your example. I can't test it on VC though.

Demo here.

share|improve this answer
1  
Seems like VC is the problem, because it gives the same error as before on it. Do you know if it's legal to refer to a nonexistent type like that and expect SFINAE? If it is then I'll make a separate solution for VC, but if it just happens to be a quirk of GCC or something then I'm not sure... –  Mehrdad Aug 20 '12 at 6:27
    
@Mehrdad I don't see how that couldn't end up in SFINAE. The substitution will fail when using Foo. It surely is a problem with VC. This compiles with both gcc and clang. –  mfontanini Aug 20 '12 at 6:32
    
+1 I see... ok thanks. –  Mehrdad Aug 20 '12 at 6:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.