Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hello I got some stored procedures to create products and other stuff on my site. Now I have to run some of them in a transaction. Is that possible or do I have to make a stored procedure only for the transaction?

Can I say something like

BEGIN TRAN
"1. stored procedure"
"2. stored procedure"
COMMIT
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

To add to the other answers above, you may want to add some error handling:

BEGIN TRAN

BEGIN TRY

   EXEC P1

   EXEC P2

   COMMIT TRAN

END TRY
BEGIN CATCH

  ROLLBACK TRAN

END CATCH

Update with C# code:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection(...))

    trans = conn.BeginTransaction();

    try
   {
       ...call P1 using transaction
       ...call P2 using transaction

       trans.Commit();
   }
   catch
   {
       trans.RollBack();
       throw;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
try catch isent that Gregs answer just an easier way. ? he checks every return value and then stop. if one dident return 0. thaks for the answer!. –  saadan Aug 20 '12 at 7:30
    
now i got it to work with the try catch but if i make it fail can i send a rows effected number or something like that to see when it fails. –  saadan Aug 20 '12 at 7:50
    
You can send whatever you need from the catch - slightly different from Gregs answer - say you needed to add a third proc, the if...else answer would rapidly get quite complex. also, if it fails, no rows will be affected - you're rolling it back..? –  Paddy Aug 20 '12 at 8:24
    
yes if and else will be complex that im aware of. before i got my try catch in the c# code so if the query failed it showed an error but now i got the error handling in the sql so i need something to sendt back as result of the query. –  saadan Aug 20 '12 at 8:52
    
You could keep the try...catch in your C# code and use a SqlTransaction to manage your transaction from the calling code. I personally find it a lot easier to keep trans code out of the sprocs and in the data layer. Makes composing stored procedures easier at a later stage. –  Paddy Aug 20 '12 at 10:04

From SQL Server (not sure about other RDBMS), You can call multiple stored procedures inside a transaction.

BEGIN TRAN
EXEC StoredProc1
EXEC StoredProc2
COMMIT TRAN

You may want to add a return code to the stored proc to check if you should run stored proc 2 if stored proc 1 failed

EDIT: To check a return code you can do something like the following. This will run the first stored proc. If it returns 0 then it runs the 2nd. If the 2nd returns 0 then it commits the transaction. If either returns non-0 then it will rollback the transaction

DECLARE @ReturnValue INT
BEGIN TRAN
  EXEC @ReturnValue = StoredProc1
  IF @ReturnValue = 0
  BEGIN
    EXEC @ReturnValue = StoredProc2
    IF @ReturnValue = 0
    BEGIN
      COMMIT
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
      ROLLBACK
    END
  END
  ELSE
  BEGIN
    ROLLBACK
  END
share|improve this answer
    
Should have added, if stored proc 2 fails then it will be able to rollback stored proc 1 –  Greg Aug 20 '12 at 6:18
    
so if i got a return code on storedproc1 how do i check the value. sorry im not good at sql. but thanks for the help –  saadan Aug 20 '12 at 6:30
    
@saadan, I've updated my answer with an extra exmample –  Greg Aug 20 '12 at 6:44
    
thanks man that helped alot!. –  saadan Aug 20 '12 at 7:17

Yes you can run stored procs in transaction, It is so simple as you can try running a query before posting it here

create table temp1
(
    id int,
    name varchar(20)
)

create table temp2
(
    id int,
    name varchar(20)
)
go

create proc p1 as
insert temp1 values (1, 'test1')


create proc p2 as 
insert temp2 values (1, 'test2')
go  

begin tran tx
exec p1
exec p2
commit
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.