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We have an Online Judge (something similar to SPOJ.pl) where we conduct these 3 hour long contests during the weekends, by the end of which we have close to around 1000 submissions. And we store all these runs on a single table (which includes the submitted code). The present structure of the table is as follows :

+------------+----------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field      | Type     | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+------------+----------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| rid        | int(11)  | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| pid        | int(11)  | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| tid        | int(11)  | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| language   | tinytext | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| name       | tinytext | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| code       | longtext | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| time       | tinytext | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| result     | tinytext | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| error      | text     | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| access     | tinytext | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| submittime | int(11)  | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| output     | longtext | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+------------+----------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

Now the problem is that, every time we use the ORDER BY clause while querying within this, it ends up sorting the whole table. And in case of more than 1000 rows, each with a considerable amount of data, the time taken is significant. Please note that this is after OPTIMIZE-ing the tables at regular intervals say there have been changes made to the submissions. We do have two options :

  1. Split up the tables after say around 100 entries.
  2. Store the huge chunks of data (the submitted code) as files instead of inserting them as values into the table to reduce the overhead.

Is there another alternative/workaround to this were we can actually maintain the table structure as it is? I could really use some help here. Thanks.

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1  
@ManMohanVyas, suggesting changing not only RDBMS but DBMS because the OP has a few records in they're table is, in my opinion, a massive over-reaction. 1,000 rows is a very small table no matter how wide they are. –  Ben Aug 20 '12 at 9:33
1  
What is your query, the structure of your tables, the explain plan and indexes? RDBMS are built to handle many, many times the amount of data you're talking about. –  Ben Aug 20 '12 at 9:34
    
@Ben : I've added the structure of the table. –  Vishnu Aug 20 '12 at 12:41

1 Answer 1

My recommendation would be to do something called vertical partitioning: split the table into multiple tables, with different columns.

In this case, I would have one table that has all the small data: rid, pid, tid, language, name, time, result, access, submittime.

A second table would have: rid, code, error, output.

This way, you can do the sort on the first table and then join in the other fields after the sort. I put code, error, and output together since they sort of seem to go together.

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