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In a Project I each of the user interaction events make a network call (Which is TCP, not HTTP). A need Activity Indicator to be global to show from a random UIViewController and hide from NetworkActivityManager Class (a custom class to handle network activities, Which is not a subclass of UIViewController or UIView).

After searching the web I found out that MBProgressHUD is used for the same purpose, but I wasn't able to find out an example on how would I use it globally. (By saying global I mean a singleton object of MBProgressHUD and class methods to SHOW and HIDE it.)

Following is what I have tried yet, but, failed: In AppDelegate.h:

@property (nonatomic, retain) MBProgressHUD *hud;

In AppDelegate.m:

@synthesize hud;

In some random UIViewController object:

appDelegate.hud = [MBProgressHUD showHUDAddedTo:appDelegate.navigationController.topViewController.view animated:YES];
appDelegate.hud.labelText = @"This will take some time.";

And while hiding it, from NetworkActivityManager Class:

[MBProgressHUD hideHUDForView:appDelegate.navigationController.topViewController.view animated:YES];

This makes the project to crash after some time (due to memory issues.) I am using ARC in my project and also, I am using the ARC version of MBProgressHUD.

Am I missing something?

Important Question:

Can I make MBProgressHUD work like UIAlertView? (Saying that I mean implementation of MBProgressHUD independent of UIView -- sa it uses showHUDAddedTo: to present itself) ???

Please Note: In the above code of hiding MBProgressHUD, View may be changed from what it was when showing MBProgressHUD.

Any Help greatly appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 23 down vote accepted

You could add this to a class of your liking (e.g., to the AppDelegate).

+ (MBProgressHUD *)showGlobalProgressHUDWithTitle:(NSString *)title {
    UIWindow *window = [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] windows] lastObject];
    MBProgressHUD *hud = [MBProgressHUD showHUDAddedTo:window animated:YES];
    hud.labelText = title;
    return hud;
}

+ (void)dismissGlobalHUD {
    UIWindow *window = [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] windows] lastObject];
    [MBProgressHUD hideHUDForView:window animated:YES];
}

This can be than called on any class. You don't need to keep a strong reference to the HUD when using those class convenience methods.

Depending on your specific situation you'll probably also want to handle cases where a new hud is requested before the other one is hidden. You could eater hide the previous hud when a new comes in or come up with some sort of queueing, etc.

Hiding the previous HUD instance before showing a new one is pretty straightforward.

+ (MBProgressHUD *)showGlobalProgressHUDWithTitle:(NSString *)title {
    UIWindow *window = [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] windows] lastObject];
    [MBProgressHUD hideAllHUDsForView:window animated:YES];
    MBProgressHUD *hud = [MBProgressHUD showHUDAddedTo:window animated:YES];
    hud.labelText = title;
    return hud;
}
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what would be view in [MBProgressHUD showHUDAddedTo:view animated:YES]; –  AlwaysThere Aug 22 '12 at 17:53
    
It should have been window. I corrected the mistake. –  Matej Bukovinski Aug 23 '12 at 10:25
    
Will try and see if it works... and thanks for your answer –  AlwaysThere Aug 23 '12 at 12:05
2  
If using this way, the progress HUD does not rotate with device orientation. Anyone got solution? –  Khawar Sep 6 '13 at 6:16
1  
This worked a lot better for me: UIWindow *window = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate].window, and it solves the rotation problem –  David Lawson Nov 4 '13 at 23:03

I've used it as below..Hope it helps you..

in appDelegate.m

-(void)showIndicator:(NSString *)withTitleString currentView:(UIView *)currentView
{ 
if (!isIndicatorStarted) {

    // The hud will dispable all input on the view
    self.progressHUD = [[[MBProgressHUD alloc] initWithView:currentView] autorelease]; 
    // Add HUD to screen 
    [currentView addSubview:self.progressHUD]; 
    self.progressHUD.labelText = withTitleString;
    [window setUserInteractionEnabled:FALSE];
    [self.progressHUD show:YES];

    isIndicatorStarted = TRUE;
}   
 } 

-(void)hideIndicator 
{ 

    [self.progressHUD show:NO]; 
    [self.progressHUD removeFromSuperview]; 
    self.progressHUD = nil;
    [window setUserInteractionEnabled:TRUE];
    isIndicatorStarted = FALSE;
}

From Random Views:-

[appDel showIndicator:@"Loading.." currentView:presentView.view];

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How would I call it to show from the class which is not UIView or UIViewController subclass. This is the reason why I want to make it independent of UIViews. Like UIAlertView, any idea on this ??? –  AlwaysThere Aug 20 '12 at 6:44
    
the class which is not UIView or UIViewController subclass ??? means ? –  Maulik Aug 20 '12 at 6:56
    
Any class which represent MODEL of the project, not VIEWS or CONTROLLERS. –  AlwaysThere Aug 20 '12 at 6:59

This answer is what I've been using for 5-6 Apps now because it works perfectly inside blocks too. However I found a problem with it. I can make it shown, but can't make it disappear if a UIAlertView is also present. If you look at the implementation you can see why. Simply change it to this:

static UIWindow *window;

+ (MBProgressHUD *)showGlobalProgressHUDWithTitle:(NSString *)title {

    window = [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] windows] lastObject];
    MBProgressHUD *hud = [MBProgressHUD showHUDAddedTo:window animated:YES];
    hud.labelText = title;

    return hud;
}

+ (void)dismissGlobalHUD {

    [MBProgressHUD hideHUDForView:window animated:YES];
}

This will make sure you're removing the HUD from the same windows as it was shown on.

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Just FWIW, 2014, here's a very simple setup we use. This uses David Lawson's critical comment that

UIWindow *window = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate].window

is the best solution. Just as Matej says, your AppDelegate.h/m is a very sensible place to do it.

In your prefix file,

#define APP ((AppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate])

(that is generally useful to you in many ways.)

Then in AppDelegate.h

// our convenient huddie system (messages with a hud, spinner)
@property (nonatomic, strong) MBProgressHUD *hud;
-(void)huddie;

then in AppDelegate.m

-(void)huddie
{
// centralised location for MBProgressHUD
[self.hud hide:YES];

UIWindow *windowForHud = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate].window;
self.hud = [MBProgressHUD showHUDAddedTo:windowForHud animated:YES];

self.hud.dimBackground = YES;
self.hud.minShowTime = 0.1;
self.hud.labelText = @"";
self.hud.detailsLabelText = @"";
}

We find it's easier to set the titles, etc, in your code where you are using it, the reason being that you very often change them during the processing of something. (For example, "Step 1!" .. "Step 2!") And it's KISS.

-(void)loadBlahFromCloud
{
[APP huddie];
APP.hud.labelText = @"Connecting to Parse...";
APP.hud.detailsLabelText = @"step 1/2";

[blah refreshFromCloudThen:
    ^{
    [... example];
    }];
}

-(void)example
{
APP.hud.labelText = @"Connecting to the bank...";
APP.hud.detailsLabelText = @"step 2/2";

[blah sendDetailsThen:
    ^{
    [APP.hud hide:YES];
    [...  showNewDisplay];
    }];
}

Obviously, you could change huddle to take the texts as an argument, if you prefer.

Note that you almost always want self.hud.minShowTime = 0.1; to avoid flicker.

And IMO in practice in most projects what you need to use is self.hud.dimBackground = YES; for me it seems more iOS7 to do that. Plus, thank heavens, it blocks UI for you while work happens - a miracle.

Don't forget that as the MBProgressHud crew explain in the doco, of course you usually have to "slightly wait" to begin work / end work when you bring up such a process, as with any similar programming with the UI. (It's not a game engine, you can't "yield a frame!")

So in practice your code will usually look like this...

-(void)loadActionSheets
{
[APP huddie];
APP.hud.labelText = @"Loading json from net...";

dispatch_after_secs_on_main(0.1 ,
    ^{
    [STUBS refreshNowFromCloudThen:
        ^{
        [APP.hud hide:YES];
        dispatch_after_secs_on_main(0.1 , ^{ [self buildActionsheet]; });
        }];
        }
    );
}

(The MB dudes recommend a short time like 0.01. Personally I feel 0.1 always works well and actually makes the flow better for users, as a UX matter.)

Just FTR we always use this common macro (again in your prefix file)...

#define dispatch_after_secs_on_main( SS, BB )                   \
        dispatch_after(                                         \
            dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, SS*NSEC_PER_SEC),  \
            dispatch_get_main_queue(),                          \
            BB                                                  \
            )

...if you're wondering what the hell dispatch_after_secs_on_main is! It's pretty much essential to have a macro like that when you're tinkering around with the UI. Cheers

As always

A HUGE THANK YOU TO THE MBPROGRESSHUD CREW !

A HUGE THANK YOU TO THE MBPROGRESSHUD CREW !

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