Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've implemented a program able to solve the n-puzzle problem with A*. Since the space of the states is too big I cannot precompile it and I have to calculate the possible states at runtime. In this way A* works fine for a 3-puzzle, but for a 4-puzzle can take too long. Using Manhattan distance adjusted with linear conflicts, if the optimal solution requires around 25 moves is still fast, around 35 takes 10 seconds, for 40 takes 180 seconds. I haven't tried more yet.
I think that's because I must keep all visited states, since I'm using functions admissible but (I think) not consistent (i tried also with Hamming and Gaschnig distances and a few more). Since the space of the solution is a graph the heuristic must also be consistent, otherwise the algorithm can loop or be not optimal. That's why I keep all visited nodes (it's also written in the book "AI: A modern approach"). But anyway, this storage does not slow at all. What slows is keeping the queue of nodes to be visited ordered.
So I decided to try IDA* that, as I saw, does not require this storage (but still I have to keep all visited states to avoid loops). It's faster for solutions that require 35 or less moves, but for 40 it's much slower.
Here is my code. Am I doing something wrong?

public static State solveIDAStar(State initialState) {
    int limit = initialState.getManhattanDistance() + 2 * initialState.getLinearConflicts();
    State result = null;
    while(result == null) {
        visitedStates.add(initialState); // It's a global variable
        result = limitedSearch(initialState, limit);
        limit = newLimit;
        visitedStates.clear();
    }
    return result;
}

public static State limitedSearch(State current, int limit) {
    for(State s : current.findNext()) {
        if(s.equals(GOAL)) {
            s.setParent(current);
            return s;
        }
        if(!visitedStates.contains(s)) {
            s.setPathCost(current.getPathCost() + 1);
            s.setParent(current);
            int currentCost = s.getManhattanDistance() + 2 * s.getLinearConflicts() + s.getPathCost();
            if(currentCost <= limit) {
                visitedStates.add(s);
                State solution = limitedSearch(s, limit);
                if(solution != null)
                    return solution;
            } else {
                if(currentCost < newLimit)
                    newLimit = currentCost;
            }
        }
    }
    return null;
}
share|improve this question
    
Where do you modify current? As I see it - the algorithm will return an answer only if there is a direct edge between source to target - but I am probably missing something here. Could you clarify this point? – amit Aug 20 '12 at 7:14
    
@amit I don't modify the object itself, but I call the function recursively giving each time a current's successor. It's a normal recursive DFS, with a depth-limit (chosen using a heuristic). – Simon Aug 20 '12 at 7:45
    
Yes, I missed the recursive call for some reason. Thanks for clarifying. – amit Aug 20 '12 at 7:54
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Old stuff moved down.

Changes so that newLimit can skip steps (the bestSolution stuff):

State bestSolution; // add this global

public static State solveIDAStar(State initialState) {
    int limit = initialState.getManhattanDistance() + 2 * initialState.getLinearConflicts();
    bestSolution = null; // reset global to null
    State result = null;
    while(result == null) {
        visitedStates.add(initialState); // It's a global variable
        newLimit = INFINITY;
        result = limitedSearch(initialState, limit);
        limit = newLimit;
        visitedStates.clear();
    }
    return result;
}

public static State limitedSearch(State current, int limit) {
    for(State s : current.findNext()) {
        if(s.equals(GOAL)) {
            s.setParent(current);
            return s;
        }
        if(!visitedStates.contains(s)) {
            s.setPathCost(current.getPathCost() + 1);
            s.setParent(current);
            int currentCost = s.getManhattanDistance() + 2 * s.getLinearConflicts() + s.getPathCost();
            if(currentCost <= limit) {
                visitedStates.add(s);
                State solution = limitedSearch(s, limit);
                if(solution != null &&
                   (bestSolution == null || solution.getPathCost() < bestSolution.getPathCost()))
                        bestSolution = solution; // cache solution so far
            } else {
                if(currentCost < newLimit)
                    newLimit = currentCost;
            }
        }
    }
    return null;
}

Original answer

So I found an open source implementation. Miraculously, it is also in java.

The application can be tested here: http://n-puzzle-solver.appspot.com/

And the source code specifically relevant is: http://code.google.com/p/julien-labs/source/browse/trunk/SlidingPuzzle/src/be/dramaix/ai/slidingpuzzle/server/search/IDAStar.java

Not sure how much the 1st change suggested below might change the time taken, but I am quite sure that you need to make the 2nd change.


First change

By comparing the code, you will find that this function

private Node depthFirstSearch(Node current, int currentCostBound, State goal)

is basically your function here

public static State limitedSearch(State current, int limit)

and Julien Dramaix's implementation doesn't have:

if(!visitedStates.contains(s)) {
    ...
    visitedStates.add(s);

So take those two lines out to test.


2nd change

Your function public static State solveIDAStar(State initialState) does something weird in the while loop.

After you fail once, you set the maximum depth (limit) to infinity. Basically, 1st iteration, you try find a solution as good as your heuristic. Then you try to find any solution. This is not iterative deepening.

Iterative deepening means every time you try, go a little bit deeper.

Indeed, looking at the while loop in public PuzzleSolution resolve(State start, State goal), you will find nextCostBound+=2;. That means, every time you try, try find solutions with up to 2 more moves.


Otherwise, everything else looks similar (although your exact implementation of the State class might be slightly different).

If it works better, you might also want to try some of the other heuristics at http://code.google.com/p/julien-labs/source/browse/#svn%2Ftrunk%2FSlidingPuzzle%2Fsrc%2Fbe%2Fdramaix%2Fai%2Fslidingpuzzle%2Fclient.

The heuristics are found in the server/search/heuristic folder.

share|improve this answer
    
I have already saw that. The only better heuristic I can use is a pattern database, since Manhattan distance adjusted with linear conflict already works really good. About the first change: I do that check to avoid loop or to come back at a state already visited. Since the space is a graph and I don't think that the heuristics are consistent, I have to do that check. – Simon Aug 20 '12 at 7:40
    
About the loop: an efficient implementation should set the limit as the smallest f-cost (f = path cost + heuristic) of any node that exceeded the limit on the previous iteration. That's what I want to do. Actually you are right, I have to remove newCost = INFINITE (I edited the code). But now the algorithm is faster for solutions that requires few moves, and slower for bigger ones. Btw, using newLimit += 2 it's slower for little solution, faster for bigger. I don't know why. – Simon Aug 20 '12 at 7:43
    
With the 2nd change, the += 2 is part of what iterative deepening is. First try find a solution with very few moves (eg. 10 moves). If nothing is found, throw your work away, and try find a solution using up to 12 moves. If nothing is found, throw your work away, and try find a solution using up to 14 moves ... . The advantage is that if the optimal solution takes 50 moves, the algorithm won't be trying solutions taking 200 moves (which might be within a huge search space). – ronalchn Aug 20 '12 at 8:10
    
With the 1st change, it doesn't matter that you come back to a state already visited, as long as you have made the 2nd change. That is because with iterative deepening, you are limiting your moves anyways. So you won't be searching forever. Whether this is useful in a graph in general, depends on how likely it will try to revisit a state, and also how many states are visited. For this problem, I think making the change improves it, because adding it into a visited states container imposes a O(log n) operation every insert and search (I am assuming you have a self balancing BST there). – ronalchn Aug 20 '12 at 8:14
    
Ah, I can see what you mean by setting newLimit as the smallest heuristic cost. However, the +=2 is probably just an estimate. Of course you don't want newLimit any smaller than the smallest f-cost/heuristic, but you might want it larger. Depending on the problem graph, different rates of iterative deepening might be beneficial. Therefore, experiment with whether newLimit = currentCost + 2 or + something else might be better. The reason is otherwise limit might only increase by 1 at a time otherwise (which might be too slow) – ronalchn Aug 20 '12 at 8:20

A small issue: you said "What slows is keeping the queue of nodes to be visited ordered.". In this case you can use a "Priority Heap". This is a partial ordered queue that always return the min (or max) item in e queue, insertions, retrieves - removes are O(log n), so this can make a bit fast your initial A* algorithm. Here a send you a simple implementation, but is made in C#, you need to translate it to Java...

public class PriorityHeap<T>
{
    private int count;
    private int defaultLength = 10;
    private PriorityHeapNode[] array;
    private bool isMin;

    /// <summary>
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="isMin">true si quiere que la ColaHeap devuelva el elemento de menor Priority, falso si quiere que devuelva el de mayor</param>
    public PriorityHeap(bool isMin)
    {
        this.count = 0;
        this.isMin = isMin;
        this.array = new PriorityHeapNode[defaultLength];
    }
    public PriorityHeap(bool isMin, int iniLength)
    {
        this.count = 0;
        this.isMin = isMin;
        this.defaultLength = iniLength;
        this.array = new PriorityHeapNode[defaultLength];
    }

    public class PriorityHeapNode
    {
        T valor;
        int _priority;

        public PriorityHeapNode(T valor, int _priority)
        {
            this.valor = valor;
            this._priority = _priority;
        }

        public T Valor
        {
            get
            { return this.valor; }
        }
        public double Priority
        {
            get
            { return this._priority; }
        }

    }
    public int Count
    { get { return this.count; } }

    /// <summary>
    /// Devuelve true si la cola devuelve el valor de menor Priority, falso si el de mayor
    /// </summary>
    public bool IsMin
    { get { return isMin; } }

    /// <summary>
    /// Devuelve y quita el Valor Minimo si la cola lo permite,si no, retorna null
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public PriorityHeapNode GetTopAndDelete()
    {
        PriorityHeapNode toRet;
        if (count > 0)
        {
            if (count == 1)
            {
                toRet = array[0];
                array[0] = null;
                count--;
                return toRet;
            }
            else
            {
                toRet = array[0];
                array[0] = array[count - 1];
                array[count - 1] = null;
                HeapyfiToDown(0);
                count--;
                return toRet;
            }
        }
        else return null;

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Devuelve el tope pero no lo borra
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public PriorityHeapNode GetTop()
    {
        return array[0];
    }
    public void Insert(PriorityHeapNode p)
    {
        if (array.Length == count)
            Add(p);
        else array[count] = p;
        count++;
        HeapyfiToUp(count - 1);
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        count = 0;
    }

    #region Private Functions
    private int GetFather(int i)
    {
        return ((i + 1) / 2) - 1;
    }
    private int GetRightSon(int i)
    { return 2 * i + 2; }
    private int GetLeftSon(int i)
    { return 2 * i + 1; }

    private void Add(PriorityHeapNode p)
    {
        if (array.Length == count)
        {
            PriorityHeapNode[] t = new PriorityHeapNode[array.Length * 2];
            for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
            {
                t[i] = array[i];
            }
            t[count] = p;
            array = t;
        }
    }

    private void HeapyfiToUp(int i)
    {
        if (isMin)
        {
            int father = GetFather(i);
            if (father > -1 && array[father].Priority > array[i].Priority)
            {
                PriorityHeapNode t = array[father];
                array[father] = array[i];
                array[i] = t;
                HeapyfiToUp(father);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            int father = GetFather(i);
            if (father > -1 && array[father].Priority < array[i].Priority)
            {
                PriorityHeapNode t = array[father];
                array[father] = array[i];
                array[i] = t;
                HeapyfiToUp(father);
            }
        }
    }
    private void HeapyfiToDown(int i)
    {
        if (isMin)
        {
            #region HeapyFi To down Min
            int l = GetLeftSon(i);
            int r = GetRightSon(i);

            if (r < count)
            {
                PriorityHeapNode right = array[r];
                PriorityHeapNode left = array[l];
                int t;
                if (right != null && left != null)
                {
                    t = left.Priority < right.Priority ? l : r;
                }
                else if (right != null)
                    t = r;

                else if (left != null)
                    t = l;
                else return;

                if (array[t].Priority < array[i].Priority)
                {
                    PriorityHeapNode temp = array[t];
                    array[t] = array[i];
                    array[i] = temp;
                    HeapyfiToDown(t);
                }
            }
            else if (l < count)
            {
                PriorityHeapNode left = array[l];
                int t;
                if (left != null)
                    t = l;
                else return;
                if (array[t].Priority < array[i].Priority)
                {
                    PriorityHeapNode temp = array[t];
                    array[t] = array[i];
                    array[i] = temp;
                    HeapyfiToDown(t);
                }
            }
            #endregion
        }
        else
        {
            #region HeapyFi To down NOT Min
            int l = GetLeftSon(i);
            int r = GetRightSon(i);

            if (r < count)
            {
                PriorityHeapNode right = array[r];
                PriorityHeapNode left = array[l];
                int t;
                if (right != null && left != null)
                {
                    t = left.Priority > right.Priority ? l : r;
                }
                else if (right != null)
                    t = r;

                else if (left != null)
                    t = l;
                else return;

                if (array[t].Priority > array[i].Priority)
                {
                    PriorityHeapNode temp = array[t];
                    array[t] = array[i];
                    array[i] = temp;
                    HeapyfiToDown(t);
                }
            }
            else if (l < count)
            {
                PriorityHeapNode left = array[l];
                int t;
                if (left != null)
                    t = l;
                else return;
                if (array[t].Priority > array[i].Priority)
                {
                    PriorityHeapNode temp = array[t];
                    array[t] = array[i];
                    array[i] = temp;
                    HeapyfiToDown(t);
                }
            }
            #endregion
        }
    }
    #endregion
}      

Hope this helps...

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I already tried to use it (java.util.PriorityQueue), but nothing changed. As far as I know, it is better if you set the right initialCapacity (and I don't know which it is), but I may be wrong... Thanks anyway :) – Simon Oct 16 '12 at 5:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.