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I have a form. And lots of textfields in it. I use allowBlank property not to allow user to left the field blank and blankText to define custom "blank error" text.

{
 xtype: 'textfield',
 fieldLabel: 'Surname',
 name: 'person_surname',
 allowBlank: false,
 blankText: 'Please fill "Surname" field',                  
},

My question is:

Is there a way to use Ext.form.field.Text's object property inside of another propery of the same object?

Something like:

{
 xtype: 'textfield',
 fieldLabel: 'Surname',
 name: 'person_surname',
 allowBlank: false,
 blankText: 'Please fill "' + fieldLabel + '" field',                  
},

(doesn't work)

or:

{
 xtype: 'textfield',
 fieldLabel: 'Surname',
 name: 'person_surname',
 allowBlank: false,
 blankText: 'Please fill "' + this.fieldLabel + '" field',                  
},

(doesn't work either)

Update:

For example in minLengthText property I can use template driven text like 'The minimum length for this field is {0}', which takes minLength property value of the same object.

I repeat: I use ExtJS's object initialization method whith object literal syntax like:

{
 xtype: 'textfield',
 fieldLabel: 'Surname',
 name: 'person_surname',
 allowBlank: false,
 blankText: 'Please fill "Surname" field',                  
},

This syntax is very neat, using another syntax is not welcome here.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

try adding listener to your form if you don't want to rewrite your code

example

listeners : {

               render : function(){
                   Ext.each(form.items.items,function(fld,idx){
                    if(fld.getXType()=='textfield'){
                       fld.blankText = fld.fieldLabel;
                    }
                   });
               }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Man, You are genius! Of course listeners on render! All my textfield objects are already initialized so I can use them in @alex's way. Thnaks for idea. – s.webbandit Aug 20 '12 at 7:58
    
You can also refer to your component as 'this' in the initComponent method. – dbrin Aug 20 '12 at 22:04

The only thing I can think of is

new function(){
    this.xtype = 'textfield';
    this.fieldLabel = 'Surname';
    this.name = 'person_surname';
    this.allowBlank = false;
    this.blankText = 'Please fill "' + this.fieldLabel + '" field';                  
}
share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't suites ExtJS objects model. I can't use functions with all my fields (I have about 40 field in form). – s.webbandit Aug 20 '12 at 7:17
    
This creates an object with a different prototype chain. – alex Aug 20 '12 at 7:50

You would need to create the object, get a reference to it, and then augment it via its reference.

var obj = {
 xtype: 'textfield',
 fieldLabel: 'Surname',
 name: 'person_surname',
 allowBlank: false
};

obj.blankText = 'Please fill "' + obj.fieldLabel + '" field';
share|improve this answer
    
As I mentioned, I have about 40 fields in form. So the only way is to define seperate properties of parent form for every textfield? Too complex. I'm searching for the way to use object's property during initilization. Maybe ExtJS specific. – s.webbandit Aug 20 '12 at 7:19
    
@webbandit You'll be searching for a long time then, as it's impossible for an object to get a reference to itself inside of a object literal in the manner that you are describing. – alex Aug 20 '12 at 7:48
    
I've understood that's it's not possible with my requirements. Thanks all of you for participation! – s.webbandit Aug 20 '12 at 7:55

You've got three options when you try to do this stuff, really:

var Object_1 = {};
Object_1.property_1 = "Something";
Object_1.property_2 = "I'm Really " + Object_1.property_1 + "!";


var Object_2 = {
    property_1 : "Something",
    property_2 : "I'm Really"
};

Object_2.property_2 += Object_2.property_1 + "!";


var Object_3 = (function () {
    var property1 = "Something",
        property2 = "I'm Really " + property1 + "!";

    return { property_1 : property1, property_2 : property2 };
}());

Each of these three objects ends up being equivalent, in terms of the user-defined properties. Personally, I use #3 an awful lot in JavaScript, expressly to avoid the problem that you're having right now.

Define properties and methods as vars within a function, and then either return a function which then has access to those original vars, or return an object (which you can attach methods to -- as long as the methods were defined inside of the original function -- which will have access to the internal vars).

share|improve this answer

How about you write a simple parser?

{
    xtype: 'textfield',
    fieldLabel: 'Surname',
    name: 'person_surname',
    allowBlank: false,
    blankText: 'Please fill [fieldlabel] field',                  
},

When you output your message, replace the macro [fieldlabel] with the object's .fieldLabel value. Add other macros for other things you might need.

share|improve this answer
    
Error messages are outputted automatically. Writing additional parser is no good. – s.webbandit Aug 20 '12 at 8:55

If your code runs in a browser that supports the ECMAScript 5 Getters and Setters feature you could use a getter to achieve what you need:

{
    xtype: 'textfield',
    fieldLabel: 'Surname',
    name: 'person_surname',
    allowBlank: false,
    get blankText(){ return 'Please fill "' + this.fieldLabel + '" field';}
},
share|improve this answer

A few alternatives:

1) This one is superior to the accepted answer because the render listener is a poor place to be modifying DOM related object properties. It has to do with the way the rendering cycle works, but it's much better to it before, average to do it after, bad to do it during. The one below is probably only applicable if you're dealing with a flat list of fields.

Ext.define('MyClass', {

    initComponent: function(){
        var fields = [{
            xtype: 'textfield',
            fieldLabel: 'Field 1'
        }, {
            xtype: 'textfield',
            fieldLabel: 'Field 2'
        }];

        Ext.Array.forEach(fields, function(field){
            field.blankText = 'Foo ' + field.fieldLabel
        });
        this.items = fields;
        this.callParent();
    }

});

2) This gives you the most control, again, no mucking about after the field is defined:

Ext.define('MyClass', {

    initComponent: function(){
        var wrap = this.wrap;

        this.items = [wrap({
            xtype: 'textfield',
            fieldLabel: 'Field 1'
        }), wrap({
            xtype: 'textfield',
            fieldLabel: 'Field 2'
        })];

        this.callParent();
    },

    wrap: function(config){
        config.blankText = 'Foo ' + config.fieldLabel;
        return config;
    }

});
share|improve this answer
    
Second one is rather good, would use it somwhere. Thanks. – s.webbandit Aug 20 '12 at 8:55

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