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I want to replace an old .live() function with .on().

.live()

 var jqRow = $('#' + id + ' tr');
 jqRow.live("click", function () {
            myFunction(this);
            return false;
        });

.on()

var jqRow = $('#' + id + ' tr');
$(document).on("click", jqRow, function () {
                    myFunction(this);
                    return false;
        });

The this of the .live() method returns a JS object (I need this). The this of the .on() method returns a jQuery object, that causes myFunction to fail.

How can I get the same non jQuery this object like in the live function?

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2  
Are you positive that this is a jQuery object? this in JavaScript is immutable so it cannot possibly be set to a jQuery object, as far as I'm aware. –  Jack Franklin Aug 20 '12 at 9:03
    
@JackFranklin this can have different values depending on how function is called for example. –  Peter Aug 20 '12 at 9:04
    
I have been tested this script and console.log(this) returns an JS document object, not jQuery object –  Kir Aug 20 '12 at 9:05
1  
I understand that, but I didn't think it was possible to set it to a jQuery object, as this is always set based on the scope in which the function was invoked. @Keith L, could you put an example on JSFiddle? –  Jack Franklin Aug 20 '12 at 9:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your syntax is incorrect, your jqRow variable is a jQuery object, but the .on() function only takes string selectors. If you pass a jQuery object, that argument is ignored, and it's the same as setting up a non-delegated event handler on the document itself.

Change this:

var jqRow = $('#' + id + ' tr'); // this line creates a jQuery object
$(document).on("click", jqRow, function () {
    myFunction(this);
    return false;
});

to this:

var jqRow = '#' + id + ' tr'; // this line initialises a string
$(document).on("click", jqRow, function () {
    myFunction(this);
    return false;
});
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Not true, on() can take a jQuery selector as the second argument. See: jsfiddle.net/2W8pM –  Jack Franklin Aug 20 '12 at 9:15
    
@JackFranklin Using e.target isn't the same as using this, your jsFiddle is meaningless. Take a look at this one, that actually matches the code in the question. –  Anthony Grist Aug 20 '12 at 9:17
    
@JackFranklin To make that clearer: when you pass anything other than a string as an argument, it's ignored (because it's invalid) and you get a direct event handler attached to the document for click events. jQuery will make this the document itself, but e.target will be the element that was originally clicked on and caused the event to propagate up the DOM all the way to the document. –  Anthony Grist Aug 20 '12 at 9:20
    
Anthony, my apologies, I misread. You are indeed correct, have amended my answer. –  Jack Franklin Aug 20 '12 at 9:31

If this is really a jQuery object, you can use this[0] or this.get(0):

The .get() method grants us access to the DOM nodes underlying each jQuery object.

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Following on from my comment, it's not possible for this to be a jQuery object. This is because the value of this within a function is set when the function is invoked, and cannot explicitly be set, it's immutable. It is possible for $(this) to be a jQuery object though, obviously.

EDIT

As @Anthony Grist pointed out, the real issue here is using a jQuery selector in .on(). If you change it to pass in a string selector, the value of this is set accordingly. My apologies for the oversight, here's a working JSFiddle.

For what it's worth, if you're delegating to a single selector, I would just call .on() on that selector:

$("#foo").on("click", function() {});

Otherwise...

If you're unable to pass in the string selector and have to pass in an actual jQuery object, you can work around it using the event object. This code works:

var jqRow = $('#foo');
$(document).on("click", jqRow, function (e) {
  myFunction(e.target);
  return false;
});

var jqRow2 = $('#bar');
jqRow2.live("click", function () {
  myFunction(this);
  return false;
 });


function myFunction(x) {
  console.log(x);
  console.log($(x).attr("id"));
}

Working JSFiddle

Remember, with the syntax you're using there for delegating does not bind an event to jqRow, it binds it to the document. jQuery doesn't let you pass in a jQuery object as to be delegated to. So the first part of the above code is fairly pointless, you could just do:

var jqRow = $('#foo');
$(document).on("click", function (e) {
  if($(e.target).attr("id") === "foo") {
    myFunction(e.target);
  }
  return false;
});

This is why the value of this within your .on() is not the object clicked, as you expected as jQuery can't delegate the event to a jQuery object, it needs a selector. So passing in e.target should fix your issue.

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great answer! +1 –  lnrbob Aug 20 '12 at 9:19
    
That's incorrect - this will be the element that was actually clicked on provided you correctly use .on() - passing a jQuery object is invalid. Using e.target is a workaround for not knowing how to actually use jQuery. –  Anthony Grist Aug 20 '12 at 9:21

you can use get() function, which takes index as parameter or you can use [].

var jqRow = $('#' + id + ' tr');
$(document).on("click", jqRow, function () {
                    myFunction(this.get(0));
                    // or this myFunction(this[0]);
                    return false;
        });
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Use

$(document).ready(function()
{ 
    var id="" ;  // ID of your Element
     var jqRow = $('#' + id);
      jqRow.on("click", 'tr', function ()
      {
                //alert($(this));
                myFunction($(this));
                return false;
       });


 });​

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