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I'm resizing an array. The resize (doubling the size) appears to work correctly, but when I send more text into the resized array, when it reaches what would have been the limit of the array before it was resized, I get a "Debug Assertion Failed! Expression: (L"Buffer is too small" && 0)" error. I've tried it a few different ways, always with the same result.

    static int ReadBufferSize, totalChars;    
    static char *ReadBuffer = NULL;
    ReadBuffer = (char *)malloc(ReadBufferSize);

    ...

    //Double buffer size.
    if((float)totalChars > (0.75f) * (float)ReadBufferSize)
    {
        char *tempBuffer = NULL;
        tempBuffer = (char *)malloc(2 * ReadBufferSize); 
        if(tempBuffer == NULL)
            free(tempBuffer);
        else
        {
            memcpy(tempBuffer,ReadBuffer,strlen(ReadBuffer)+1);
            free(ReadBuffer);
            ReadBuffer = tempBuffer;
            tempBuffer = NULL;
            ReadBufferSize *= 2;
        }
    }

For my testing, ReadBufferSize has been set initially to 85 characters. After the code resizing the array is executed, the text in ReadBuffer is still displayed on the screen. I type more characters and they are sent into the array, and from there, displayed on the screen. But when the number of characters reaches 85 characters, I get the "Debug Assertion Failed! Expression: (L"Buffer is too small" && 0)" error, when there should now be space for 170 characters. I've also tried the following.

//Double buffer size.
if((float)totalChars > (0.75f) * (float)ReadBufferSize)
{
    char* temp = 0;
    temp = new char[2 * ReadBufferSize];
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < strlen(ReadBuffer); i++)
        temp[i] = ReadBuffer[i];
    temp[strlen(ReadBuffer)] = '\0';
    delete[] ReadBuffer;
    ReadBuffer = temp;
    temp = 0;
    ReadBufferSize *= 2;
}

I've also tried:

malloc(2 * ReadBufferSize * sizeof(char));

and:

strcpy_s(tempBuffer, strlen(ReadBuffer)+1, ReadBuffer);

Many thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Just use std::string. It's C++ not C. There are just so many errors and mistakes in your code that trying to correct it is pretty pointless. – Bartek Banachewicz Aug 20 '12 at 10:01
1  
The usual suspect here is strlen. Are you sure that the string in the buffer is a proper zero-terminated string? If not, the call to strlen will not give you a correct value. – Bo Persson Aug 20 '12 at 10:05

Since you didn't provided the full minimal program it's difficult to say what is wrong. You should normally start your program in the debugger, put breakpoint inside your function and reproduce the problem. Take a look at all variables and functions like strlen(). They might return values that you don't expect.

Offtopic, but for real applications you should better use std::string which does all the tricks with memory management automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't say your last advice is "off-topic". It's actually accurate as this would probably solve many problems the OP has. – ereOn Aug 20 '12 at 10:06
    
The string in the source buffer is null terminated. I was under the impression that for(unsigned int i = 0; i < strlen(ReadBuffer); i++) temp[i] = ReadBuffer[i]; would copy all the characters except the null terminator since strlen() doesn't count the null. So that temp[strlen(ReadBuffer)] = '\0'; then null terminates the destination buffer. – GrahamZ Aug 20 '12 at 13:09
    
Everything seemed to be fine in the debugger, the code for enlarging the array was executed, I could see that the characters were copied across etc. I didn't have a way to check the actual size of the array after the operation, since all sizeof() gives you is the size of the pointer. – GrahamZ Aug 20 '12 at 13:17
    
strlen() was showing the expected values. – GrahamZ Aug 20 '12 at 13:24
    
I figured it out. I was about to post some more of my code to give you more information when I noticed the problem. I had a "pageSize" variable that I had been using for the size of the array. Then when I wanted to start dynamically changing the size, I separated the array size from the page size by creating the "ReadBufferSize" variable. Unfortunately, I still had "pageSize" in the segment of code where I was putting characters into the array: strcat_s(ReadBuffer, pageSize, keystroke); – GrahamZ Aug 20 '12 at 14:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I figured it out. I was about to post some more of my code to give you more information when I noticed the problem. I had a "pageSize" variable that I had been using for the size of the array. Then when I wanted to start dynamically changing the size, I separated the array size from the page size by creating the "ReadBufferSize" variable. Unfortunately, I still had "pageSize" in the segment of code where I was putting characters into the array:

strcat_s(ReadBuffer, pageSize, keystroke);

I've now changed it to

strcat_s(ReadBuffer, ReadBufferSize, keystroke);

and everything seems to be working. Thanks to everyone for taking the time to look at this. I was fixated on the idea that the problem must be in the section of code for resizing the array, not elsewhere.

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