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& vs && and | vs ||
What are the cases in which it is better to use unconditional AND (& instead of &&)

While checking for the simple AND condition, i can use '&' and '&&'. It works fine with '&' and as well as '&&'. Is there any difference between those two.

sample code:

if(sample!=null & sample.size())
if(sample!=null && sample.size()
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marked as duplicate by doNotCheckMyBlog, Romain, Marko Topolnik, assylias, bdares Aug 20 '12 at 9:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
Your first line of code can throw a NullPointerException, but the second can't. That's the essential difference. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 20 '12 at 9:14

6 Answers 6

first expression check both sides, second expression checks 2nd side only if 1st is true.

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It evaluates both the left hand side and the right with just a singular &, even if the last hand side is false.

See my question below for the finer details...

When should I not use the Java Shortcut Operator &

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The first version (&) always evaluates both arguments. The second version (&&) evaluates the second argument only if the first argument has been evaluated to TRUE.

Same applies to the OR operator: there is | and ||. The (||) evaluates the second argument only if the first argument has been evaluated to FALSE.

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1  
With the exception that the OR operator evaluates the second argument only if the first argument has been evaluated to false. –  maba Aug 20 '12 at 9:28
    
Thanks @maba, the answer is updated –  Ilya Shinkarenko Aug 20 '12 at 9:54
'&' for bit wise 'AND'
'&&' is for Logical 'AND'
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1  
Your statement is false and misleading. & is for both logical and bitwise operations. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 20 '12 at 9:33
if(sample!=null & sample.size())

Here if first condition is not satisfied then also it will check next condition.

if(sample!=null && sample.size())

Here if first condition is not satisfied then also it will not check next condition.

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The && is a short-circuit operator meaning that if sample is null in your example, it will stop and not evaluate the second condition.

On the other side, the & is not short-circuit and will evaluate sample.size() even if sample is null. Of course in this case it will throw NullPointerException, but in the short-circuit case it won't.

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