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When some local varibles go out of scope, stack unwinding occurs.

Exactly how destructors are called?

I want to know the mechanism through which compiler is able to call destructors of the objects that are on stack and not of the objects that are on heap.

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At compile-time the compiler has no knowledge about what objects will be on the heap during execution of the program, and what their lifetime should be, so it is not able to generate code for their cleanup. That is what smart-pointers are for. –  Björn Pollex Aug 20 '12 at 9:28

2 Answers 2

The destructor calls are emitted by the compiler in the generated code.

For example,

void foo() {
    A a;
}

compiles to:

void foo() {
    A::A(<stack-address-of-a>);
    A::~A(<stack-address-of-a>);
}

It's slightly more complicated when a function returns early; consider

void foo(int i) {
    A a;
    if (i) return;
    B b;
}

as something like

void foo() {
    A::A(<stack-address-of-a>);
    B::B(<stack-address-of-b>);
    if (i) goto destroy_a;
    B::~B(<stack-address-of-b>);
destroy_a:
    A::~A(<stack-address-of-a>);
}

Exceptions are a bit more complicated again; the usual solution involves exception regions and ranges that associate the necessary destructor calls with a call stack. See Exception Handling in LLVM for an overview.

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Since it is a stack (FILO), the destructors are being called in reversed order. So the last object created will be destroyed first.

I want to know the mechanism through which compiler is able to call destructors of the objects that are on stack

Well if it puts something to the stack, it should know how to pop it from the stack, that seems to make sense... The calls are added at the compilation process.

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