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Currently I do something like this for each field where error message may be shown:

<%@ taglib prefix="c" uri="http://java.sun.com/jsp/jstl/core"%>
<c:choose>
  <c:when test="${message == null}">
    <label>Field name</label>
    <input type="text" name="field-name">
  </c:when>
  <c:otherwise>
    <label class="error">Field name</label>
    <input type="text" name="field-name">
    <small class="error">${message}</small>
  </c:otherwise>
</c:choose>

How to DRY/make better this code? I don't want to repeat all that stuff every time when I need it in another field.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just look what you're repeating and then unify it. You're repeating the <label> and the <input> element. Just show them only once. You only need to add a class to the <label> and an additional element when there's a message.

<label class="${not empty message ? 'error' : ''}">Field name</label>
<input type="text" name="field-name">
<c:if test="${not empty message}"><small class="error">${message}</small></c:if>

You can even omit the <c:if> altogeter, if there's no message, then the <small> won't appear in any way in the UI at all.

<label class="${not empty message ? 'error' : ''}">Field name</label>
<input type="text" name="field-name">
<small class="error">${message}</small>

I'd only use a <span> instead of <small> as using the latter for this purpose is discouraged.

<label class="${not empty message ? 'error' : ''}">Field name</label>
<input type="text" name="field-name">
<span class="error">${message}</span>
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In the second snippet <small class="error"></small> appears in the UI –  Andrey Botalov Aug 21 '12 at 7:29

If you are just using plain JSP (without any additional framework) then I'd suggest to create your own custom JSP tags. A field tag and a message tag. This will be kinda reinventing the wheel as many frameworks provide something like that if it's just your only requirement, then you could give it a try.

There is Sun's tutorial about how to create your own tags, although a bit old but the internals haven't change so much and, even more, it will work with any servlet container as it is part of the standard.

I will give you the clues you need to write a simple message tag and I guess you'd be able to roll your own field one if you think you need it.

Basic approach

Start creating a base class that extends the TagSupport abstract class and override the doEndTag() method. Check inside it if there is any message attribute in the current pageContext and, iif it exists, then print that error message through the tag's print stream:

public class MessageTag extends TagSupport {

    public int doEndTag() {
        String message = pageContext.findAttribute("message");
        if (message != null) {
            StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();
            output.append("<small class=\"error\">").append(message).append("</small>");
            JspWriter out = pageContext.getOut();
            out.println(output.toString());
        }
        return EVAL_PAGE;
    }

}

Then follow the steps in the previous tutorial to define the tag library in your webapp and use it in your JSP:

<label>Field name</label>
<input type="text" name="field-name">
<mytags:message />

Real world

That would be the simplest approach. But in a real world scenario, you'd like to show a different error message depending of the field you are validating so I will add an attribute name (or something similar) to the tag class and make it able to look for different messages depending of the value of that attribute:

public class MessageTag extends TagSupport {

    private String name;

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public void release() {
        super.release();
        name = null;
    }

    public int doEndTag() {
        String lookupAttr = (name != null ? name : "message");
        String message = pageContext.findAttribute(lookupAttr);
        if (message != null) {
            StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();
            output.append("<small class=\"error\">").append(message).append("</small>");
            JspWriter out = pageContext.getOut();
            out.println(output.toString());
        }
        return EVAL_PAGE;
    }

}

That way you could reuse your tag for each specific field:

<label>Field name</label>
<input type="text" name="field-name">
<mytags:message name="field-name" />

Note that you will need to add the attribute definition to your tag library as well.

Obviously, you could make this as complex as you want (i.e.: adding a style attribute that could allow you to show INFO, WARNING or ERROR messages, etc.)

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I use Apache Tiles 3 but I don't know how it can help me. –  Andrey Botalov Aug 20 '12 at 16:37
1  
Apache Tiles is just a templating framework as long as I know, it won't help you with form validation. It would be different if you were using Struts, JSF, Spring MVC or any other full featured web framework. So, unless you want to switch to one of those, I would try the custom tags, it will take you a bit of time to get ready but at least your JSP code will look cleaner. –  Alonso Dominguez Aug 20 '12 at 16:57
    
note that you could generate the code for the input field and the message itself in one single tag (let's name if field). I wrote here the code just for an hypothetical message tag for simplicity, the tutorial linked in the answer should give you enough knowledge to write a single tag class that could be able to render both items in the generated HTML. –  Alonso Dominguez Aug 20 '12 at 17:01

You have to do somehing like this<input type="text" name="user" value="user"> Now read the value in the form where you want to use.You can use setAttribute() and getAttribute() methods to get values in the new form.

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