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I am developing some convenience wrappers around another software package that defines a bash function. I would like to replace their bash function with an identically-named function of my own, while still being able to run their function from within mine. In other words, I need to either rename their function, or create some kind of persistent alias to it that won't be modified when I create my function of the same name.

To give a brief example of a naive attempt that I didn't expect to work (and indeed it does not):

$ theirfunc() { echo "do their thing"; }
$ _orig_theirfunc() { theirfunc; }
$ theirfunc() { echo "do my thing"; _orig_theirfunc }
$ theirfunc
do my thing
do my thing
do my thing
...

Obviously I don't want infinite recursion, I want:

do my thing
do their thing

How can I do this?

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up vote 26 down vote accepted

Here's a way to eliminate the temp file:

$ theirfunc() { echo "do their thing"; }
$ eval "$(echo "orig_theirfunc()"; declare -f theirfunc | tail -n +2)"
$ theirfunc() { echo "do my thing"; orig_theirfunc; }
$ theirfunc
do my thing
do their thing
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant! Thank you, bash wizard ;-) – Carl Meyer Sep 2 '09 at 18:14

Aha. Found a solution, though it's not real pretty:

$ theirfunc() { echo "do their thing"; }
$ echo "orig_theirfunc()" > tmpfile
$ declare -f theirfunc | tail -n +2 >> tmpfile
$ source tmpfile
$ theirfunc() { echo "do my thing"; orig_theirfunc; }
$ theirfunc
do my thing
do their thing

I'm sure this could be improved by a real bash wizard. In particular it'd be nice to ditch the need for a tempfile.

Update: bash wizard Evan Broder rose to the challenge (see accepted answer above). I reformulated his answer into a generic "copy_function" function:

# copies function named $1 to name $2
copy_function() {
    declare -F $1 > /dev/null || return 1
    eval "$(echo "${2}()"; declare -f ${1} | tail -n +2)"
}

Can be used like so:

$ theirfunc() { echo "do their thing"; }
$ copy_function theirfunc orig_theirfunc
$ theirfunc() { echo "do my thing"; orig_theirfunc; }
$ theirfunc
do my thing
do their thing

Very nice!

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6  
Bash inheritance! I never thought I'd see the day. – shuckster Aug 16 '09 at 22:48

Further golfed the copy_function and rename_function functions to:

copy_function() {
  test -n "$(declare -f $1)" || return 
  eval "${_/$1/$2}"
}

rename_function() {
  copy_function $@ || return
  unset -f $1
}

Starting from @Dmitri Rubinstein's solution:

  • No need to call declare twice. Error checking still works.
  • Eliminate temp var (func) by using the _ special variable.
    • Note: using test -n ... was the only way I could come up with to preserve _ and still be able to return on error.
  • Change return 1 to return (which returns the current status code)
  • Use a pattern substitution rather than prefix removal.

Once copy_function is defined, it makes rename_function trivial. (Just don't rename copy_function;-)

share|improve this answer
    
For copying, it would be much simpler to just say newname() { oldname "$@" ; } Of course I realize it does not help to rename since it still requires oldname, and I realize the OP specifically asked about renaming, but just noting that this would be shorter in case all one wants is copying. I suppose a small function call cost would be there though... – jamadagni Oct 4 '15 at 14:16

The copy_function can be improved by using shell parameter expansion instead of tail command:

copy_function() {
  declare -F "$1" > /dev/null || return 1
  local func="$(declare -f "$1")"
  eval "${2}(${func#*\(}"
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a function based on @Evan Broder's approach:

# Syntax: rename_function <old_name> <new_name>
function rename_function()
{
    local old_name=$1
    local new_name=$2
    eval "$(echo "${new_name}()"; declare -f ${old_name} | tail -n +2)"
    unset -f ${old_name}
}

Once this is defined, you can simply do rename_function func orig_func

Note that you can use a related approach to decorate/modify/wrap existing functions, as in @phs's answer:

# Syntax: prepend_to_function <name> [statements...]
function prepend_to_function()
{
    local name=$1
    shift
    local body="$@"
    eval "$(echo "${name}(){"; echo ${body}; declare -f ${name} | tail -n +3)"
}

# Syntax: append_to_function <name> [statements...]
function append_to_function()
{
    local name=$1
    shift
    local body="$@"
    eval "$(declare -f ${name} | head -n -1; echo ${body}; echo '}')"
}

Once these are defined, let's say you have an existing function as follows:

function foo()
{
    echo stuff
}

Then you can do:

prepend_to_function foo echo before
append_to_function foo echo after

Using declare -f foo, we can see the effect:

foo ()
{
    echo before;
    echo stuff;
    echo after
}
share|improve this answer

If you just want to prepend something to the name, say orig_, then I think the simplest is

eval orig_"$(declare -f theirfun)"
share|improve this answer
    
It looks so simple :-) – Scz Sep 17 '15 at 14:21

To sum up all the other solutions and partially correct them, here is the solution which:

  • does not use declare twice
  • does not need external programs (like tail)
  • does no unexpected replacements
  • is relatively short
  • protects you against usual programming bugs thanks to correct quoting

Everything combined:

: rename_fn oldname newname
rename_fn()
{
  local a
  a="$(declare -f "$1")" &&
  eval "function $2 ${a#*"()"}" &&
  unset -f "$1";
}

now the tests:

somefn() { echo one; }
rename_fn somefn thatfn
somefn() { echo two; }
somefn
thatfn

outputs as required:

two
one

Now try some more complicated cases, which all give the expected results or fails:

rename_fn unknown "a b"; echo $?
rename_fn "a b" murx; echo $?

a(){ echo HW; }; rename_fn " a " b; echo $?; a
a(){ echo "'HW'"; }; rename_fn a b; echo $?; b
a(){ echo '"HW"'; }; rename_fn a b; echo $?; b
a(){ echo '"HW"'; }; rename_fn a "b c"; echo $?; a

One can argue that following is still a bug:

a(){ echo HW; }; rename_fn a " b "; echo $?; b

as it should fail as " b " is not a correct function name. If you really want this, you need following variant:

rename_fn()
{
  local a
  a="$(declare -f "$1")" &&
  eval "function $(printf %q "$2") ${a#*"()"}" &&
  unset -f "$1";
}

Now this catches this artificial case, too. (Please note that printf with %q is a bash builtin.)

Of course you can split this up into copy+rename like this:

copy_fn() { local a; a="$(declare -f "$1")" && eval "function $(printf %q "$2") ${a#*"()"}"; }
rename_fn() { copy_fn "$@" && unset -f "$1"; }

I hope this is the 101% solution. If it needs improvement, please comment ;)

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