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I know that SIGCONT continues a process previously stopped by SIGSTOP. Can I use SIGCONT multiple times without a SIGSTOP ? i,e , below sequence is valid ?

SIGSTOP to process A : The process stops
SIGCONT to process A : Process resumes
SIGCONT to process A : Process already runs - this SIGCONT has no effect 
SIGCONT to process A : Process already runs - this SIGCONT has no effect 
...
SIGSTOP to process A : The process stops
SIGCONT to process A : Process resumes
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The manual page says that SIGCONT means "continue if stopped, otherwise ignore", so yes. –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy Aug 20 '12 at 10:37
    
why don't you try it and find out? stackoverflow is not a replacement for experimentation –  tbert Aug 20 '12 at 10:37
2  
@tbert: While I agree that experimentation is a very good learning tool, experimentation is not a replacement for learning how it is supposed to work. Think of undefined behavior! –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy Aug 20 '12 at 10:41
    
@ThomasPadron-McCarthy okay, I'll amend my previous statement to also read "and RTFM". is your inner pedant happy now? –  tbert Aug 20 '12 at 12:00
    
@tbert: My inner pedant thanks you! –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy Aug 20 '12 at 12:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do it. TLPI says:

When sent to a stopped process, this signal causes the process to resume (i.e., to be rescheduled to run at some later time). When received by a process that is not currently stopped, this signal is ignored by default. A process may catch this signal, so that it carries out some action when it resumes.

APUE:

Note that the default action for SIGCONT is to continue the process, if it is stopped; otherwise, the signal is ignored.

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