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I want to run this command in perl

for dir in *; do
 test -d "$dir" && ( find "$dir" -name '*test' | grep -q . || echo "$dir" );
 done

I have tried :

 system ("for dir in *; do
        test -d "\$dir" && ( find "\$dir" -name '*test' | grep -q . || echo "\$dir" );
        done");

but does not work .

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4  
That shell code is easily implemented in Perl. It is wrong to involve several different languages unless it is necessary –  Borodin Aug 20 '12 at 11:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your quoting is off.

"for dir in *; do
    test -d "\$dir" && ( find "\$dir" -name '*test' | grep -q . || echo "\$dir" );
    done"

You have decided to delimit your string with double quotes ", but they are included in your string.

Either escape the other quotes:

"for dir in *; do
    test -d \"\$dir\" && ( find \"\$dir\" -name '*test' | grep -q . || echo \"\$dir\" );
    done"

(error prone, ugly)

… or use another delimiter: Perl offers you a wide range of possibilities. These quoting syntaxes interpolate variables inside: "…" and qq{…} where you can use any character in [^\s\w] as delimiter, and non-interpolating syntaxes are: '…' and q{…} with the same delimiter flexibility as before:

qq{for dir in *; do
    test -d "\$dir" && ( find "\$dir" -name '*test' | grep -q . || echo "\$dir" );
    done}

The q and qq constructs can include the delimiter inside the string, if the occurrence is balanced: q( a ( b ) c ) works.

The third quoting mechanism is a here-doc:

system( <<END_OF_BASH_SCRIPT );
for dir in *; do
    test -d "\$dir" && ( find "\$dir" -name '*test' | grep -q . || echo "\$dir" );
    done
END_OF_BASH_SCRIPT

This is usefull for including longer fragments without worrying about a delimitor. The String is ended by a predefined token that has to appear on a line of its own. If the delimitor declaration is placed in single quotes (<<'END_OF_SCRIPT'), no variables will be interpolated:

system( <<'END_OF_BASH_SCRIPT' );
for dir in *; do
    test -d "$dir" && ( find "$dir" -name '*test' | grep -q . || echo "$dir" );
    done
END_OF_BASH_SCRIPT

Note on the q{} and qq{} syntax: This is a feature never to be used outside of obfuscation, but it is possible to use a character in \w as the delimiter. You have to include a space between the quoting operator q or qq and the delimiter. This works: q xabcx and is equal to 'abc'.

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I removed the $ , and instead of "" I have used qq as you mentioned,still complains –  shaq Aug 20 '12 at 11:35
    
@shaq What part of this does not work? Do you get a syntax error in Perl, or does it fail at run time or does the shell script fail? What does the error message say? The last code fragment compiles all right with me. –  amon Aug 20 '12 at 11:57
    
It did work actually , I was making a mistake thanks –  shaq Aug 20 '12 at 12:18

A pure Perl implementation using File::Find module's find function:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use File::Find;

find \&find_directories, '.';

sub find_directories {
    if ( -d && $File::Find::name =~ /test$/ ) {
        print "$File::Find::name\n";
    }
}
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Thanks a lot , but the point is that I want to use shell script command in my Perl:) program –  shaq Aug 20 '12 at 11:36
    
You are welcome. :-) –  Alan Haggai Alavi Aug 20 '12 at 16:34

Instead of starting the script, try starting a bash instance that runs the script. E.g.

system("bash -c 'for dir bla bla bla'");
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I want the script to be inside my Perl program –  shaq Aug 20 '12 at 10:58
    
@shaq: this is a Perl solution –  Borodin Aug 20 '12 at 11:01
    
sorry , I was thinking you mean I have to pass the name of my script to bash ,anyway , I did what you said it is still complaining –  shaq Aug 20 '12 at 11:29

system() uses your default system shell, which is probably not Bash. The solution is to call Bash explicitly with the system() command.

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I implemented the same code , did not work –  shaq Aug 20 '12 at 11:30

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