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I want to write a bash script which takes different arguments. It should be used like normal linux console programs:

myProgramm -p 2 -l 5 -t 20

So the value 2 should be save in a variable called pages and the parameter l should be saved in a variable called length and the value 20 should be saved in a variable time.

What is the best way to do this?

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A variable in what? Parameters are related to the program you're runnning, not bash in this case. Does 'myProgramm' take parameters? –  Joe Aug 20 '12 at 11:01
    
I want to write a program in bash which does this. –  HotPizzaBox Aug 20 '12 at 11:05
    
Note that unless you call the script using '.' (. myProgram -p2 -l 5 -t 20), the variables you set will only exist in myProgram, not the shell from which you call it. –  chepner Aug 20 '12 at 12:51
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2 Answers

up vote 59 down vote accepted

Use the getopts-builtin
here's a tutorial

pages=  length=  time=

while getopts p:l:t: opt; do
  case $opt in
  p)
      pages=$OPTARG
      ;;
  l)
      length=$OPTARG
      ;;
  t)
      time=$OPTARG
      ;;
  esac
done

shift $((OPTIND - 1))

shift $((OPTIND - 1)) shifts the command line parameters so that you can access possible arguments to your script, i.e. $1, $2, ...

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twelve thumbs up if i could... –  jsh Nov 20 '12 at 23:01
    
mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/035 "getopt cannot handle empty arguments strings, or arguments with embedded whitespace. Please forget that it ever existed." –  Federico Aug 27 '13 at 16:44
2  
@Federico your confusing getopt and getopts... you should read your citation carefully (and please retract the down vote). You can also read here –  Theodros Zelleke Aug 27 '13 at 21:33
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Something along the lines of

pages=
length=
time=

while test $# -gt 0
do
    case $1 in
        -p)
            pages=$2
            shift
            ;;
        -l)
            length=$2
            shift
            ;;
        -t)
            time=$2
            shift
            ;;
        *)
            echo >&2 "Invalid argument: $1"
            ;;
    esac
    shift
done
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-1, far better to use getopts –  Steven Mackenzie Mar 20 at 18:17
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