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I have a text block called "findListText". Here, I am updating the text in it:

private void InstantSearch(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Key == Key.Return)
    {
        HitEnter = true;
    }
    findListText.Text = "Processing request. Please wait...";
    Find(bool.Parse("False" as string));
}

However, the next set of code is a search function that can take up to 10 seconds, and at the end of it, it changes the text in findListText again.

private void Find(bool? bForward = true)
{
    {
        //Lots and lots of code
    }
    findListText.Text = "Search completed."
}

The problem is, the textblock never seems to update to "Processing request. Please wait...". The textblock is in it's original state and 10 seconds later updates to "Search completed.", seemingly skipping out the middle man.

I'm using C# - WPF. What am I doing wrong here?

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What technology are we talking about? WPF? Win Forms? Web Forms? –  Andre Calil Aug 20 '12 at 11:12
    
What technology is this? WinForms, WPF, Silverlight, ASP.NET? –  ChrisF Aug 20 '12 at 11:12
    
BTW, note that you don't need that first if. Simply change it to HitEnter = e.Key == Key.Return; –  Andre Calil Aug 20 '12 at 11:12
    
It's a xaml form - not web based. That is, WPF. –  Robbo905 Aug 20 '12 at 11:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Doesn't matter what technology I think.

The code is running on the same thread, meaning the the UI won't be updated untill all the code on that thread is completed. You should address a different thread to update that textblock.

In that case, you will have 2 thread:

  • The origininal thread, executing the "lots and lots of code"
  • The second (extra) created thread, which will handle updating the textblock's text while the other thread is executing the other code.

I've created a little something that should resolve your problem, it's based on this Stack Overflow page

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I expect this is exactly the problem, but I'm not sure how I would go about creating a separate thread just for updating the textblock. –  Robbo905 Aug 20 '12 at 11:16
    
You don't need all that, all you have to do is to update the UI. Check my answer and give me any feedback, please. –  Andre Calil Aug 20 '12 at 11:17
    
@AndreCalil: your answer is what is described here, except you don't check if the object is owned by the thread. –  Djerry Aug 20 '12 at 11:19
    
@djerry I don't understand how the link you provided can be used in my specific situation. Could you possibly clarify this for me? Thanks. –  Robbo905 Aug 20 '12 at 13:53
    
You are right, that solution is for a slightly different problem. I'll update the answer and work more on the solution app. –  Djerry Aug 20 '12 at 14:34

Since this is WPF, try the following: after changing the text to "Processgin", call:

Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, new Action(delegate { this.UpdateLayout(); }));

This will tell the thread to update the UI as soon as possible.

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If it owns the thread. –  Djerry Aug 20 '12 at 11:18
    
@djerry Indeed. However, as far as we know the application, it's a single thread. –  Andre Calil Aug 20 '12 at 11:26
    
I have mixed success with this. I essentially have two search functions, one which takes milliseconds, and the long 10 second one. If I use this line of code for the short search the "Processing request" message appears, if only for a split second. On using this line of code with the long 10 second search, nothing happens. –  Robbo905 Aug 20 '12 at 11:26
    
This fix is hit and miss overall and is not the right way to handle these situations. Think about it - How can the UI update if the UI thread is busy doing work? This type of situation is exactly why BackgroundWorker was created. –  steveg89 Aug 20 '12 at 11:29
    
@Robbo905 Have you tried chaging the text before the long-time processing? –  Andre Calil Aug 20 '12 at 11:29

You should look into the UI threading concept of WPF. Invoke the Dispatcher to modify the textbox. Also the search should run with ThreadPool.QueueWorkerItem.

// Start worker thread
ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(state =>
{
    // Long running logic here
   findListText.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() => findListText.Text = "Processing request. Please wait...");
   Find(bool.Parse("False" as string)); 


    // Tip: Run change on GUI thread from the worker using the dispatcher
    findListText.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() => findListText.Text = "Search completed.");
});
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I'm not sure where to begin with this one. I seem to be getting a "'System.Threading.ThreadPool' does not contain a definition for 'QueueWorkerItem'" error. –  Robbo905 Aug 20 '12 at 11:43

Here is how to run your find method in its own thread.

private void InstantSearch(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Key == Key.Return)
    {
        HitEnter = true;
    }
    findListText.Text = "Processing request. Please wait...";
    BackgroundWorker tempWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
    tempWorker.DoWork += delegate
    {
       Find(bool.Parse("False" as string));
    };
    tempWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
}

If you try that, you'll get an error because you access your UI thread from the background thread. So you'll need to update your find method as well.

private void Find(bool? bForward = true)
{
   {
       //Lots and lots of code
   }
   Dispatcher.BeginInvoke((Action) delegate {
      findListText.Text = "Search completed."
   });
}
share|improve this answer

I came back to this just now, and had another browse across the internet for similar problems. For something as simple as pushing a single message before a long running process occurs, I'm surprised no-one suggested "Application.DoEvents();". Yes, I know it has it's flaws, and my UI will still hang, but this suits me perfectly for my situation, at least.

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Having said that, it still isn't perfect. –  Robbo905 Aug 24 '12 at 12:32

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