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Could you explain why the following code doesn't compile? An obvious workaround is to add a 1-argument overload of Apply, is there a simpler one?

template <typename T>
T Identity(const T& i_val)
  {
  return i_val;
  }

template <typename Val, typename Fn>
Val Apply(const Val& v, Fn fn = Identity<Val>)
  {
  return fn(v);
  }

int main() {
  Apply(42);              // error: no matching function for call to 'Apply(int)'
  Apply(42, Identity<int>); // OK
  return 0;
}
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1  
you have no default value for template. – CyberGuy Aug 20 '12 at 12:33
    
Note that your Identity function always makes a copy -- is that intentional? – Kerrek SB Aug 20 '12 at 12:38
1  
@KerrekSB: It is not intentional. Is it relevant to the question? – Andrey Aug 20 '12 at 12:44
1  
@Andrey: No, it's just a comment. – Kerrek SB Aug 20 '12 at 12:47
    
@KerrekSB: What is a danger if it is making a copy? (probably, it would be a separate question:) ) – Andrey Aug 20 '12 at 12:48
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Looking up the function to call consists of: 1. creating the set of candidates, which includes template argument deduction 2. determining the best overload

If I understand the standard correctly, only actual function arguments (i.e., not the default ones) take part in deducing the template arguments. Therefore from the argument 42, the only thing the compiler can infer is that Val = int. The overload does not enter the candidate set and the default argument is never looked at.

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Template argument deduction doesn't work that way -- you can't deduce the type of an argument from a defaulted value. In C++11, you can however specify a default template argument:

template <typename Val, typename Fn = Val(&)(Val const &)>
Val Apply(const Val& v, Fn fn = Identity<Val>)
{
   return fn(v);
}
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Can you please explain your sentence you can't deduce the type of an argument from a defaulted value with example in your answer? thanks – Mr.Anubis Aug 20 '12 at 12:38
1  
@Mr.Anubis: What I mean is that you can't deduce the type of fn from a value that's given as a defaulted function argument. Argument deduction can only be performed on function arguments that were specified at the call site. – Kerrek SB Aug 20 '12 at 12:40
1  
Ahh understood , thanks with +1 :) – Mr.Anubis Aug 20 '12 at 12:42

Apply is a templated function. You need to do Apply<MyValueType,MyFuncType>(42);

You could reasonably expect the compiler to infer Val to be int, but you can't expect it to infer the type of function, even though you've given a default parameter. As a result, it won't infer that you're trying to call that declaration of the Apply function.

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