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Let's say, I've two classes

class A
{
  public:
    void foo( /* ............. */ );
};

class B
{
   public:
      void bar();
};

I want to know, if it's even possible to pass to the foo method a pointer of bar method, store it in A and run bar later from A. I should say, that A won't know, what class bar is a member of!

I'd appreciate much if you show me the syntax or some link with not that complicated description of the topic.

DESCRIPTION I'm designing an observer pattern for C++. I want to subscribe B to some events of A. e.g. this code should be in an instance of B

   // pseudo code    
   A* observable = new A();
   observable->addEventListener ( 'eventTitle' , functionName );

And when eventTitle occurs A calls functionName of B

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What have you tried? and why do you need this? I think there are better ways to solve your problem or what ever you want... –  tuxtimo Aug 20 '12 at 12:49
    
Please post a pseudo-code use case example of the desired behaviour. –  Kerrek SB Aug 20 '12 at 12:54
    
Does bar() have to be a member of class B? –  Digital Da Aug 20 '12 at 12:58
    
Do you really need to pass a pointer-to-member-function?, you might solve your problem just using polymorfism. What are you actually trying to achieve? –  Antonio Pérez Aug 20 '12 at 13:02
    
If you are using C++11, you can pass it as std::function<void()>. –  Vaughn Cato Aug 20 '12 at 13:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is a couple of methods how to call a pointer to member function, hiding it's origin:

  • Use std::function and std::bind:

    class B {    
        double Sqrt(int what) { return std::sqrt((double)what); }
    };   
    
    // in A:
    std::tr1::function<double (int)> fn; 
    fn = std::tr1::bind(&B::Sqrt, &operations, std::tr1::placeholders::_1);
    fn(3.1415);
    
  • Use a functor, which will wrap the pointer to member function and the object, on which it's to be called, togeter. (This is a bit complicated, though, and in principle is just a subset of what std::function does).

  • Derive B from an abstract interface IFn and pass B as IFn reference to Foo. Foo will know what to call - a virtual Do() function of the interface.
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How can A use a member function of B without knowing anything about it? To call it, you need an object, which has to be o type B (or subtype), so A must have this knowledge.

If you make bar() a static function, you can use regular function pointer (void (*)()) or std::function<void ()> (boost::function for older C++) - of which I would strongly recommend the latter.

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That won't work unless bar is declared as a static member of B. You should take into account that you would need an instance of B in order to call any non-static methods.

(Check the C++ FAQ chapter on pointer-to-member-functions for a deeper explanation.)

UPDATE: if you want to implement an observer pattern, you can declare an interface (pure abstract class), say Observer, that A knows and use pointer-to-member-functions to map your events to the corresponding Observer methods.

Example:

   A observable;
   observable.addEventListener ( 'eventTitle' , &B::functionName );
   B observer;
   observable.registerObserver(&observer);
share|improve this answer
    
An instance of B, in fact (I guess it was just a typo). –  Gorpik Aug 20 '12 at 12:56
    
@Gorpik A typo indeed, thanks. –  Antonio Pérez Aug 20 '12 at 12:57

Use something like:

class A
{
public:
  void foo( /* ............. */ );
  void SetObs(CObs *pObs)
  {
    m_pObs = pObs;
  }

private:
  CObs *m_pObs;
};

class B : public class CObs
{
public:
  virtual void bar();
};

class CObs
{
public:
  virtual void bar() = 0;
};

And whenever you need bar() function call m_pObs->bar(). Also derive all slasses like B from CObs and override the function bar().

share|improve this answer
    
This won't compile: A doesn't know CObs. If you declare CObs before A, there might be no need to pass a pointer-to member-function to foo, and I'm not sure that is a feasible escenario for the OP. –  Antonio Pérez Aug 20 '12 at 13:05

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