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I have the following method for my android program, written in Java.

The method takes in a string of hex and returns a string of the same text written in ascii.

public static String hexToString(String hex)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    for (int count = 0; count < hex.length() - 1; count += 2)
    {
        String output = hex.substring(count, (count + 2));    //grab the hex in pairs

        int decimal = Integer.parseInt(output, 16);    //convert hex to decimal

        sb.append((char)decimal);    //convert the decimal to character
    }

    return sb.toString();
}

The method works fine, however my program is very time critical and this method is potentially being called tens of thousands of times. When analysing the slow bits of my program, this method takes up far too much time because of:

Integer.parseInt(output, 16);

and

hex.substring(count, (count + 2));

In the order of slowest first.

Does anyone know of a faster method of achieving the same thing?

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1  
why don't you try using a look up table? –  L7ColWinters Aug 20 '12 at 14:19
    
I agree. You could also consider working with larger chunks (IE. a full int instead of half-ints), but given the overhead with then manipulating those into chars, it might not give you a substantial performance boost. –  LJ2 Aug 20 '12 at 14:25
    
Do you mean have a table with the hex value and its corresponding ascii value? –  Pippa Rose Smith Aug 20 '12 at 14:37
    
Have a look at Apache's method I posted in my answer. It really outperforms all others here. –  Fabian Barney Aug 21 '12 at 19:19
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't create a new String on each iteration. One way to improve performance would be using a char array and applying math operations per character.

public static String hexToString(String hex) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    char[] hexData = hex.toCharArray();
    for (int count = 0; count < hexData.length - 1; count += 2) {
        int firstDigit = Character.digit(hexData[count], 16);
        int lastDigit = Character.digit(hexData[count + 1], 16);
        int decimal = firstDigit * 16 + lastDigit;
        sb.append((char)decimal);
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

More info about this method:

Also, if you're parsing the hex string in pairs, you can use a look up table as @L7ColWinters suggests:

private static final Map<String, Character> lookupHex = new HashMap<String, Character>();

static {
    for(int i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
        String key = Integer.toHexString(i);
        Character value = (char)(Integer.parseInt(key, 16));
        lookupHex.put(key, value);
    }
}

public static String hexToString(String hex) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (int count = 0; count < hex.length() - 1; count += 2) {
        String output = hex.substring(count, (count + 2));
        sb.append((char)lookupHex.get(output));
    }
    return sb.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This one is a lot faster, averages around 0.026819ms while authors averages around 0.172089ms. But, instead of Integer.parseInt(..) which expects a String as a 1st parameter, use Character.digit(..). –  iccthedral Aug 20 '12 at 14:49
    
@iccthedral you're right, I'll edit the code now. –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 20 '12 at 14:51
    
Do you mean the top one or the lookup table bottom one is the fastest? –  Pippa Rose Smith Aug 20 '12 at 14:54
    
@PippaRoseSmith it would be better if you do the benchmark between all the methods posted here. Also, to measure the time correctly, use System#nanoTime. An explanation of this advice: System.currentTimeMillis vs System.nanoTime –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 20 '12 at 15:09
    
@PippaRoseSmith how many tests are you running to measure the effectiveness of the codes? –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 20 '12 at 15:23
show 5 more comments

What about this one...

public static String hexToString(final String str) {
 return new String(new BigInteger(str, 16).toByteArray());
}
share|improve this answer
    
That method doesn't produce the same result on a hex string as my original method... does it take into account 01 instead of 1 and things like that? –  Pippa Rose Smith Aug 20 '12 at 14:36
    
On what input? On "6162636465" they both give the abcde. Anyhow, I profiled my method and it took a lot longer than yours did. I'll leave my answer, someone might consider it. –  iccthedral Aug 20 '12 at 14:42
    
Thanks anyway :) –  Pippa Rose Smith Aug 20 '12 at 14:52
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Another alternative would be to just do some simple arithmetics:

public static int hexCharToInt(char c)
{
    int result = 0;
    if(c >= 'A' && c <= 'F')
    {
        result += (c - 'A' + 10);
    }
    else if( c >= '0' && c <= '9')
    {
            result += (c - '0');
    }
        return result;
    }

public static String hexToString(String hex)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    for (int count = 0; count < hex.length() - 1; count += 2)
    {
        char c1 = hex.charAt(count);
        char c2 = hex.charAt(count + 1);

        int decimal = hexCharToInt(c1) * 16 + hexCharToInt(c2);

        sb.append((char)decimal);    //convert the decimal to character
    }

    return sb.toString();
}

Try it out and see which solution that works best on your system!

share|improve this answer
    
In this case, it would result even faster if you use a look up to store the char/int key/value pair. –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 20 '12 at 15:10
    
@Luiggi Mendoza: Are you sure? Maybe a lookup in form of a simple array would be slightly faster, but with such few values in a map, I think it is hard to predict which way will be fastest. I think the sum of all answers here give a pretty good idea of what to try and then I guess some measurements on the target system will show the best way to go. –  ekholm Aug 20 '12 at 16:14
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This code was taken from Hex class of Apache Commons Codec and simplified a bit. (Removed some range checks etc. which is not necessary for understanding here. In practice you want to use the original implementation.)

/**
 * Converts an array of characters representing hexadecimal values into an array of bytes of those same values. The
 * returned array will be half the length of the passed array, as it takes two characters to represent any given
 * byte. An exception is thrown if the passed char array has an odd number of elements.
 * 
 * @param data
 *            An array of characters containing hexadecimal digits
 * @return A byte array containing binary data decoded from the supplied char array.
 * @throws DecoderException
 *             Thrown if an odd number or illegal of characters is supplied
 */
public static byte[] decodeHex(char[] data) throws DecoderException {

    int len = data.length;

    byte[] out = new byte[len >> 1];

    // two characters form the hex value.
    for (int i = 0, j = 0; j < len; i++) {
        int f = Character.digit(data[j], 16) << 4;
        j++;
        f = f | Character.digit(data[j], 16);
        j++;
        out[i] = (byte) (f & 0xFF);
    }

    return out;
}

You can use the returned byte[] to construct a String object afterwards.

So when using Apache Commons Codec then your method looks like this:

public static String hexToString(String hex) throws UnsupportedEncodingException, DecoderException {
    return new String(Hex.decodeHex(hex.toCharArray()), "US-ASCII");
  }
share|improve this answer
    
The only problem here is that OP is sending the hex string in substrings of 2 chars. –  Luiggi Mendoza Aug 21 '12 at 17:19
    
@LuiggiMendoza Sry, don't get it. What's the problem? What char sequence works with yours or OPs code but not with "mine"? –  Fabian Barney Aug 21 '12 at 18:08
    
@LuiggiMendoza My tests with your two methods and the original Apache Codec method are producing the same result where your first method takes about 8,900 millis, your 2nd method takes about 21,100 millis and Apache's method takes about 6,700 millis for decoding a 1182 chars long hex string resulting in 591 chars long decoded ASCII string each done a million times. So Apache's method is much faster than yours. –  Fabian Barney Aug 21 '12 at 18:50
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