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I've posted a question on how to read from a file and return a random word from that file, and everyone keeps telling me use "List words = new ArrayList();" I did try to use it and it doesnt work!

I've tried everything! i'm very new at java, for i'm still a student! so the internet is my last option, text books are useless...

all i want to do is return a random string from that file and then use it as the guessing word

enter image description here

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import java.io.*;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.*;

public final class Hangman extends JFrame implements ActionListener {
    int i = 0;
    static JPanel panel;
    static JPanel panel2;
    static JPanel panel3;
    static JPanel panel4;

    public Hangman() {
        JButton[] buttons = new JButton[26];

        panel = new JPanel(new GridLayout(0, 9));
        panel2 = new JPanel();
        panel3 = new JPanel();
        panel4 = new JPanel();

        JButton btnRestart = new JButton("Restart");
        btnRestart.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

            }
        });

        JButton btnNewWord = new JButton("Add New Word");
        btnNewWord.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                try {
                    FileWriter fw = new FileWriter("Words.txt", true);
                    PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(fw, true);

                    String word = JOptionPane
                            .showInputDialog("Please enter a word: ");

                    pw.println(word);
                    pw.close();
                } catch (IOException ie) {
                    System.out.println("Error Thrown" + ie.getMessage());
                }
            }
        });

        JButton btnHelp = new JButton("Help");
        btnHelp.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                String message = "The word to guess is represented by a row of dashes, giving the number of letters and category of the word. \nIf the guessing player suggests a letter which occurs in the word, the other player writes it in all its correct positions. \nIf the suggested letter does not occur in the word, the other player draws one element of the hangman diagram as a tally mark."
                        + "\n"
                        + "\nThe game is over when:"
                        + "\nThe guessing player completes the word, or guesses the whole word correctly"
                        + "\nThe other player completes the diagram";
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, message, "Help",
                        JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);
            }
        });

        JButton btnExit = new JButton("Exit");
        btnExit.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                System.exit(0);
            }
        });
        JLabel lblWord = new JLabel();

        ImageIcon icon = new ImageIcon(
                "D:\\Varsity College\\Prog212Assign1_10-013803\\images\\Hangman1.jpg");
        JLabel label = new JLabel();
        label.setIcon(icon);
        String b[] = { "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K",
                "L", "M", "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R", "S", "T", "U", "V", "W",
                "X", "Y", "Z" };
        for (i = 0; i < buttons.length; i++) {
            buttons[i] = new JButton(b[i]);

            panel.add(buttons[i]);
        }

        panel2.add(label);

        panel3.add(btnRestart);
        panel3.add(btnNewWord);
        panel3.add(btnHelp);
        panel3.add(btnExit);

        panel4.add(lblWord);
    }

    public void readWord() {
        try {
            BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(
                    "Words.txt"));
            String line = reader.readLine();
            List<String> words = new ArrayList<String>();
            while (line != null) {
                String[] wordsLine = line.split(" ");
                for (String word : wordsLine) {
                    words.add(word);
                }
                line = reader.readLine();
            }
            Random rand = new Random(System.currentTimeMillis());
            String randomWord = words.get(rand.nextInt(words.size()));
        } catch (Exception e) {
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Hangman frame = new Hangman();
        Box mainPanel = Box.createVerticalBox();
        frame.setContentPane(mainPanel);
        mainPanel.add(panel, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        mainPanel.add(panel2);
        mainPanel.add(panel4);
        mainPanel.add(panel3);
        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Not supported yet.");
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
What goes wrong? –  SomeKittens Aug 20 '12 at 14:31
3  
What is the error? –  Nambari Aug 20 '12 at 14:31
4  
text books are useless? –  davidmontoyago Aug 20 '12 at 14:32
4  
You don't seem to do anything with the random word (String randomWord) after assigning to it. –  weston Aug 20 '12 at 14:33
3  
Your indentation is atrocious. –  Wug Aug 20 '12 at 14:33

4 Answers 4

There are 2 classes called List in Java. There is the java.util.List and java.awt.List. Make sure you are not mixing them by accident. I see you are importing java.awt.*, so Java thinks you want the java.awt.List, but you want the java.util.List version to make it compile. Easiest is to fully qualify the List in the problematic statement:

java.util.List<String> words = new ArrayList<String>();
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 good catch - I would recommend fully qualifying the imports instead of the declaration, but that's just a preference. Poster is importing java.util.* and java.awt.* –  jeff Aug 20 '12 at 14:38
    
okay so now I used the java.util.List, the error is gone, but how do i get the word then? I've been working on this problem 2 days straight, my eye's are killing me! –  Jaun Lloyd Aug 20 '12 at 14:49
    
Try printing the exception you swallow in the readWord() method by using: e.printStackTrace() Maybe there is a hidden problem there. –  Wim Deblauwe Aug 20 '12 at 14:53

Your problem lies in

import java.awt.*;

The java.awt package contains a class called List, just like java.util, but that is not the List you want. You're trying to import both of them which causes interference. Either:

  • Remove import java.awt.*; and add imports for the specific classes you use or
  • Qualify the List reference as java.util.List<String> or
  • Just use ArrayList<String> directly
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for use ArrayList directly. No reason to use the interface here. –  weston Aug 20 '12 at 14:39

You should import java.util.List explicitly

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being the shortest possible answer that fixes the problem. –  Wug Aug 20 '12 at 14:40
    
@Wug, no the shortest answer is: ArrayList<String> words = new ArrayList<String>(); Just added Array to var declaration. –  weston Aug 20 '12 at 14:42
    
@weston Since he's a student, it might be interesting to teach him the difference between interfaces and concrete classes. The only reason to use ArrayList for the declaration of the variable is lazyness in solving this issue. –  Joeri Hendrickx Aug 20 '12 at 14:49
    
@JoeriHendrickx I was just saying it's not the shortest possible answer! It's not a lazy solution, it's optimal as you could do more work to solve it but there would be no benefit in using the List interface in that situation, it's just a local variable after all. –  weston Aug 20 '12 at 15:34

The error say it all: The type List is ambiguous

You call two different classes:

import java.util.ArrayList;

and

import java.awt.List;

that's being called by import java.awt.*;

you have to use a same classes for both of the List instances.

for example:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

or avoid from using import java.awt.*; , instead use

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.GridLayout;

or use the ArrayList<String> directly:

ArrayList<String> words = new ArrayList<String>();
share|improve this answer
1  
@SiGanteng ok.. and how could i knew it? i wrote my answer while Wim Deblauwe wrote his. –  Kuf Aug 20 '12 at 14:39
    
@Kuf the compilation error would have stated exactly what the problem is. In Eclipse, clicking on the red warning dot would show it. –  slim Aug 20 '12 at 14:45
1  
@Kuf also a general point, this is one reason why it's good to keep GUI code and program logic in separate .java classes. Fewer imports in each file -> fewer opportunities for namespace clashes. –  slim Aug 20 '12 at 14:46
    
@slim yea i know :D been working with eclipse last 7 years.. –  Kuf Aug 20 '12 at 14:46
    
Sorry @Kuf I thought you were the OP –  slim Aug 20 '12 at 14:52

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