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I'm looking to do something along the lines of

awk '/begin-regex/,/end-regex/'

but a little more advanced. I want to search for entire functions, specifically in Java, but I can't see any reason it wouldn't work for C/C++ or others that use curly braces ({ and }).

Here's some sample code (sourced from http://introcs.cs.princeton.edu/java/14array/Sample.java.html)

public class Sample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int M = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);    // choose this many elements
        int N = Integer.parseInt(args[1]);    // from 0, 1, ..., N-1

        // create permutation 0, 1, ..., N-1
        int[] perm = new int[N];
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
            perm[i] = i;

        // create random sample in perm[0], perm[1], ..., perm[M-1]
        for (int i = 0; i < M; i++)  {

            // random integer between i and N-1
            int r = i + (int) (Math.random() * (N-i));

            // swap elements at indices i and r
            int t = perm[r];
            perm[r] = perm[i];
            perm[i] = t;
        }

        // print results
        for (int i = 0; i < M; i++)
            System.out.print(perm[i] + " ");
        System.out.println();
    }
}

Now I just want to pull out the main function.

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int M = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);    // choose this many elements
        int N = Integer.parseInt(args[1]);    // from 0, 1, ..., N-1

        // create permutation 0, 1, ..., N-1
        int[] perm = new int[N];
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
            perm[i] = i;

        // create random sample in perm[0], perm[1], ..., perm[M-1]
        for (int i = 0; i < M; i++)  {

            // random integer between i and N-1
            int r = i + (int) (Math.random() * (N-i));

            // swap elements at indices i and r
            int t = perm[r];
            perm[r] = perm[i];
            perm[i] = t;
        }

        // print results
        for (int i = 0; i < M; i++)
            System.out.print(perm[i] + " ");
        System.out.println();
    }

So clearly I can't just look for main(.*?) {.*?} because that would stop at the end of the 2nd for loop, giving back

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int M = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);    // choose this many elements
        int N = Integer.parseInt(args[1]);    // from 0, 1, ..., N-1

        // create permutation 0, 1, ..., N-1
        int[] perm = new int[N];
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
            perm[i] = i;

        // create random sample in perm[0], perm[1], ..., perm[M-1]
        for (int i = 0; i < M; i++)  {

            // random integer between i and N-1
            int r = i + (int) (Math.random() * (N-i));

            // swap elements at indices i and r
            int t = perm[r];
            perm[r] = perm[i];
            perm[i] = t;
        }

which isn't enough.

How can I modify this simple awk script to keep count of the opened braces and closed braces and ignore comments? And if it outputs all occurrences of the function that would be better than just the first.

EDIT: This wasn't really clear before, but I am aware that regular languages cannot solve this, which is why I'm asking for something in awk. I know that awk is capable of counting and is able to do what I'm asking.

share|improve this question
3  
Even the most simple expression using parentheses or brackets need a grammar to be written/parsed, regex is not enough –  SJuan76 Aug 20 '12 at 14:50
1  
And boy is C++ grammar complex. ;-) –  netcoder Aug 20 '12 at 14:53
2  
Most languages can't be parsed using regular expressions; C++ certainly can't. –  Mike Seymour Aug 20 '12 at 14:59
    
I'm not looking for a regex. I understand grammars and turing machines and all that fun stuff. If I could do it with a simple regex, I'd be using egrep, not awk. –  Agrajag9 Aug 20 '12 at 15:13
    
specifically in Java, but I can't see any reason it wouldn't work for C/C++ or others that use curly braces ({ and }). Well, I do: void f() const throw(std::exception) try { ... } catch (...) {} is a proper C++ function, but not Java. void f() synchronized throws(Exception) {...} is proper Java (or close enough)... And that without compiler extensions like __attribute__... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 20 '12 at 16:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

awk is the wrong tool for this job. It's great at recognizing regular expressions, but this task requires some honest-to-God parsing, which awk really isn't built for. Some problems you'd have to account for:

  • files where function type, declarator, { (and possibly }) appear on the same source line vs. files where they're all on different source lines;
  • multiple occurrences of { or } on the same source line;
  • function name, {, or } appearing in comments
  • distinguishing between a function definition and a function call;
  • properly recognizing hairy function prototypes in C and C++;

Regarding that last bit, remember that in C and C++ the following is a perfectly legal function prototype:

int *(*(*foo(char *s))(int x))[SIZE] { ... }

where foo is a function returning a pointer to another function returning a pointer to a SIZE-element array of pointers to int.

At the very least, you'd need a BEGIN block to set up some state variables (one to check whether you've read the function declarator, one to keep track of the current scope, one to keep track of whether or not you're in a comment block, etc.). Then you'd have to read every line, splitting it into fields and attempting to recognize the function declarator, { and }, comment delimiters, etc.

Honestly, I'm not sure it wouldn't be less work writing up a simple C, C++, or Java program to do this.

share|improve this answer

you are doing a ctags job, invoke ctags to generate a tags file, then parse the tags file will make life easier.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I do not have permissions on this machine to install new packages so this doesn't help. –  Agrajag9 Aug 20 '12 at 15:14
1  
@Agrajag9: Just compile ctags and run it from your home directory. Trying to analyze code with just a regex is asking too much. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 20 '12 at 16:12
    
Also the server has no access to the internet and I don't have permissions to run the compiler. –  Agrajag9 Aug 20 '12 at 17:31
    
Can you compile crags elsewhere and move the executable to the server? Otherwise, you are asking how to rewrite ctags in awk which won't be easy –  antlersoft Aug 20 '12 at 18:41

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