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I am developing an application in C / Objective-C (No C++ please, I already have a solution there), and I came across an interesting use case.

Because clang does not support nested functions, my original approach will not work:

#define CREATE_STATIC_VAR(Type, Name, Dflt) static Type Name; __attribute__((constructor)) void static_ ## Type ## _ ## Name ## _init_var(void) { /* loading code here */ }

This code would compile fine with GCC, but because clang doesn't support nested functions, I get a compile error:

Expected ';' at end of declaration.

So, I found a solution that works for Clang on variables inside a function:

#define CREATE_STATIC_VAR_LOCAL(Type, Name, Dflt) static Type Name; ^{ /* loading code here */ }(); // anonymous block usage

However, I was wondering if there was a way to leverage macro concatenation to choose the appropriate one for the situation, something like:

#define CREATE_STATIC_VAR_GLOBAL(Type, Name, Dflt) static Type Name; __attribute__((constructor)) void static_ ## Type ## _ ## Name ## _init_var(void) { /* loading code here */ }
#define CREATE_STATIC_VAR_LOCAL(Type, Name, Dflt) static Type Name; ^{ /* loading code here */ }(); // anonymous block usage

#define SCOPE_CHOOSER LOCAL || GLOBAL
#define CREATE_STATIC_VAR(Type, Name, DFLT) CREATE_STATIC_VAR_ ## SCOPE_CHOOSER(Type, Name, Dflt)

Obviously, the ending implementation doesn't have to be exactly that, but something similar will suffice.

I have attempted to use __builtin_constant_p with __func__, but because __func__ is not a compile-time constant, that wasn't working.

I have also tried to use __builtin_choose_expr, but that doesn't appear to work at the global scope.

Is there something else I am missing in the docs? Seems like this should be something fairly easy to do, and yet, I cannot seem to figure it out.

Note: I am aware that I could simply type CREATE_STATIC_VAR_GLOBAL or CREATE_STATIC_VAR_LOCAL instead of messing with macro concatenation, but this is me attempting to push the limits of the compiler. I am also aware that I could use C++ and get this over with right away, but that's not my goal here.

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Doesn't clang support nested functions at all? For GCC there's the -fnested-functions switch, isn't that available for clang? And btw why do you need this at compile time? Checking func for NULL or an empty string would do the job, wouldn't it? –  user529758 Aug 26 '12 at 9:11
    
@H2CO3 Yes, this is a macro to create a static variable loaded from a config, it needs to be compile time. As far as clang not supporting nested functions, read this: clang.llvm.org/docs/UsersManual.html#c_unimpl_gcc –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 26 '12 at 14:48
    
thanks, that's interesting (and also sorry...) –  user529758 Aug 26 '12 at 16:07
    
Btw exactly what are you trying to achieve using this? Shouldn't you redsign your code a bit instead of CPP hackery? –  user529758 Aug 30 '12 at 19:45
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1 Answer 1

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+100
#define SCOPE_CHOOSER LOCAL || GLOBAL
#define CREATE_STATIC_VAR(Type, Name, DFLT) CREATE_STATIC_VAR_ ## SCOPE_CHOOSER(Type, Name, Dflt)

The biggest difficulty here is that the C preprocessor works by textual substitution, so even if you figured out how to get SCOPE_CHOOSER to do what you want, you'd end up with a macro expansion that looked something like

CREATE_STATIC_VAR_LOCAL || GLOBAL(Type, Name, Dflt);

There's no way to get the preprocessor to "constant-fold" macro expansions during substitution; the only time things are "folded" is when they appear in #if expressions. So your only hope (modulo slight handwaving) is to find a single construction that will work both inside and outside of a function.

Can you explain more about the ultimate goal here? I don't think you can load the variable's initial value with __attribute__((constructor)), but maybe there's a way to load the initial value the first time the function body is entered... or register all the addresses of these variables into a global list at compile-time and have a single __attribute__((constructor)) function that traverses that list... or some mishmash of those approaches. I don't have any specific ideas in mind, but maybe if you give more information something will emerge.

EDIT: I don't think this helps you either, since it's not a preprocessor trick, but here is a constant-expression that will evaluate to 0 at function scope and 1 at global scope.

#define AT_GLOBAL_SCOPE __builtin_types_compatible_p(const char (*)[1], __typeof__(&__func__))

However, notice that I said "evaluate" and not "expand". These constructs are compile-time, not preprocessing-time.

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Yes, you can set an initial value in a constructor block, I used it in my answer on How Tto write an iOS app purley in C?. –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 30 '12 at 18:39
    
SCOPE_CHOOSER was supposed to expand to one of LOCAL or GLOBAL, dependent upon current scope. –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 30 '12 at 18:40
    
@RichardJ.RossIII #1 — I mean "I don't think you can solve your problem with __attribute__((constructor))." Obviously you can do what you've already done, but that didn't solve your problem. And #2 — Can you give any examples of preprocessor macros that expand to "one of" two different things depending on context of any sort? My point is that macro expansion is less powerful than expression evaluation; token-pasting a macro that evaluates to the right thing won't help unless you can actually make it expand to the right thing (and nothing but). –  Quuxplusone Aug 30 '12 at 18:47
    
Here is an example on IDEone using entirely preprocessor: ideone.com/5vHOt. As you can see, it creates a string based on the number of arguments passed in. Using the same logic, if we could somehow find a way to pass a certain number of arguments based on whether or not we are in function scope, we could use the same thing. –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 30 '12 at 19:25
    
"I don't think you can load the variable's initial value with __attribute__((constructor))" -- Well, I just used that technique in one of my enterprise apps, so it must work... –  user529758 Aug 30 '12 at 19:44
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