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i have the following:

test <- data.table(id=1:11, t=c(rep(1:2,5), 3))
test[length(unique(id))>1,list(id, t), by=t]

    id t
 1:  1 1
 2:  2 2
 3:  3 1
 4:  4 2
 5:  5 1
 6:  6 2
 7:  7 1
 8:  8 2
 9:  9 1
10: 10 2
11: 11 3

i expected this to group test by t, evaluate the j statement on each group, and return the rows where i is true (that is there is more than 1 unique id). instead what is returned is this:

> test
     id t
 1:  1 1
 2:  2 2
 3:  3 1
 4:  4 2
 5:  5 1
 6:  6 2
 7:  7 1
 8:  8 2
 9:  9 1
10: 10 2  
11: 11 3

It seems as though the by applies to the j only and not to i. Any suggestions here?

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Rightly or wrongly, i runs first then j runs by by on all the rows that pass i.

A common idiom is something like this (similar to HAVING in SQL) :

test[,list(id, u=length(unique(id))), by=t][u>1]

and to exclude u (the number of unique ids within each group) from the result :

test[,list(id, u=length(unique(id))), by=t][u>1][,u:=NULL]

Btw, doing vector scans in i on (much smaller) aggregated results (such as u>1 in the line above) is much more efficient than doing vector scans on the (much larger) original data.

If j ran by by on the whole dataset, followed by i on the result (as you expected) then it would cause a problem for efficiency. Consider if it worked that way. Then a filter first followed by grouping on the result would need to be split up into two [ calls: DT[i][,j,by]. Then i doesn't see j (within [.data.table) and doesn't know which columns it needs. Combining it into one DT[i,j,by] allows i to inspect j before evaluation and only subset the columns that j needs. This makes a very large difference in large datasets on queries which use a small subset of the columns.


To see what happened, take your i and make it j :

test[,length(unique(id))>1]  
# [1] TRUE

Then the single TRUE was recycled. DT[TRUE] == DT. You can always test i by making it j like that.

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this is fantastic as always Matt, thank you. –  Alex Aug 20 '12 at 17:12
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