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I have written a Fortran program (let's call it program.exe) with does some simulation for me. Via ssh I'm logging ino some far away computers to start runs there whose results I collect after a few days. To be up-to-date how the program proceeds I want to write the shell output into a text file output.txt also (since I can't be logged in the far away computers all the time). The command should be something like

nohup program.exe | tee output.txt > /dev/null &

This enables me to have a look at output.txt to see the current status even though the program hasn't ended its run yet. The above command works fine on my local machine. I tried first with the command '>' but here the problem was that nothing was written into the text file until the whole program had finish (maybe related to the pipe buffer?). So I used the workaround with 'tee'.

The problem is now that when I log into the computer via ssh (ssh -X user@machine), execute the above command and look at output.txt with the VI editor nothing appears until the program has finished. If I omit the 'nohup' and '&' I will not even get any shell output until it has finished. My thought was that it might have to do something with data being buffered by ssh but I'm rather a Linux newbie. For any ideas or workaround I would be very grateful!

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Use tail -f to follow the file instead, and see if that gets you output. –  FrankieTheKneeMan Aug 20 '12 at 16:01
Does your program emit line breaks? Most linux standard libraries buffer their output per-line, so if you're not emitting line breaks, there may not be any output to see! Try testing your program without the redirection... you can always kill it with CTRL-C if it's taking too long. –  Woodrow Douglass Aug 20 '12 at 16:04
tail -f output.txt unfortunately does not give me any output, like looking at it with VI... And yes, I emit line breaks during my output. Nevertheless thanks for your tips; I now switched to use the 'screen' command (see below). –  Campion Bond Aug 21 '12 at 8:18

1 Answer 1

I would use screen utility instead of nohup. Thus I would be able to set my program to detached state (^A^D) reconnect to the host, retrieve my screen session (screen -r) and monitor my output as if I never logged out.

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Thanks a lot for that hint! With 'screen' I now can do all I wanted to do! –  Campion Bond Aug 21 '12 at 8:15

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