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Macroexpand-all in SBCL gives me the following expansion:

(SB-CLTL2:MACROEXPAND-ALL
 '(LAMBDA (A B)
   (DECLARE ((SIGNED-BYTE 4) A))
   (+ A B
    (SYMBOL-MACROLET ((A 1) (B 2))
      (+ A
         B)))))    
=>
(LAMBDA (A B)
  (DECLARE ((SIGNED-BYTE 4) A))
  (+ A B
     (SYMBOL-MACROLET ((A 1) (B 2))
       (+ (THE (SIGNED-BYTE 4) 1)
          2))))

Why does A get expanded to (THE (SIGNED-BYTE 4) 1) and not just 1?

I understand that this comes from the (DECLARE ((SIGNED-BYTE 4) A)), but should this affect SYMBOL-MACROLET at all?

Shouldn't it even be valid to expand to something that is not a (SIGNED-BYTE 4)?

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Hm. The closest thing I could find is "Exactly the same declarations are allowed as for LET, with one exception: SYMBOL-MACROLET signals an error if a SPECIAL declaration names one of the symbols being defined as a symbol-macrolet. A type declaration of one of these symbols is equivalent to wrapping a THE expression around the expansion of that symbol." (from lispworks.com/documentation/lw50/CLHS/Issues/iss337_w.htm), but I don't really think that this is relevant (in particular, I could not find this language in the CLHS proper). –  Dirk Aug 20 '12 at 17:14
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2 Answers 2

Disclaimer I don't know if this really answer the question. Comments and edits are welcome.

An open issue

As Dirk said in the comment, in Common Lisp The Language is said that (section dedicated to the declare form (link)):

There are certain aspects peculiar to symbol-macrolet. [..] a type declaration of a name defined by symbol-macrolet is equivalent in effect to wrapping a the form mentioning that type around the expansion of the defined symbol.

As far as I can tell, the issue is somewhat controversial, e.g. it seems to be an open issue. Is it mandatory or no? Read here:

Issue SYMBOL-MACROLET-TYPE-DECLARATION Writeup

[..] must (or might) the value returned by MACROEXPAND or MACROEXPAND-1 include a THE form if there are type declarations that apply to the symbol-macro being expanded?

There are four proposals, YES, NO, MAYBE, and PROBABLY. Read about them in the article I linked above. Each of the four proposal has a rationale.

SBCL does this. It's a choice of the implementors, I think.

Why? Well, the rationale for the YES gives a reason.


There are some advantages(?)

For example, optimization of the code may be somewhat 'easier' for the compiler. Check this.

No declarations, no the in the expansion:

Take this:

(SB-CLTL2:MACROEXPAND-ALL
          '(LAMBDA (A B)
            (+ A B
             (SYMBOL-MACROLET ((A 1) (B 2))
               (+ A B)))))

the result is simply:

(LAMBDA (A B)
  (+ A B
     (SYMBOL-MACROLET ((A 1) (B 2))
       (+ 1 2))))

if you put the latter in a file you badly want to optimize, say with something like this:

(declaim (optimize (speed 3) (debug 0) (safety 0)))

and you compile it, SBCL will give you a bunch of warns like this:

; note: forced to do GENERIC-+ (cost 10)
;       unable to do inline fixnum arithmetic (cost 1) because:
;       The first argument is a NUMBER, not a FIXNUM.
;       The result is a (VALUES NUMBER &OPTIONAL), not a (VALUES FIXNUM &REST T).
;       unable to do inline fixnum arithmetic (cost 2) because:
;       The first argument is a NUMBER, not a FIXNUM.
;       The result is a (VALUES NUMBER &OPTIONAL), not a (VALUES FIXNUM &REST T).
;       etc.

With declarations, SBCL puts the in the expansion:

Now try this:

(SB-CLTL2:MACROEXPAND-ALL
          '(LAMBDA (A B)
            (DECLARE ((SIGNED-BYTE 4) A))
            (declare ((signed-byte 4) B))
            (+ A B
             (SYMBOL-MACROLET ((A 1) (B 2))
               (+ A B)))))

this is the expansion:

(LAMBDA (A B)
  (DECLARE ((SIGNED-BYTE 4) A))
  (DECLARE ((SIGNED-BYTE 4) B))
  (+ A B
     (SYMBOL-MACROLET ((A 1) (B 2))
       (+ (THE (SIGNED-BYTE 4) 1) (THE (SIGNED-BYTE 4) 2)))))

Put the latter in a file, put the declaim for optimization, compile. Guess what? No Warn. SBCL no longer complains about not being able to do some hardocore optimization to your code. It can do it. Because of the (THE (SIGNED-BYTE 4) 1) part.

More about the the special form

So maybe it's a way to ensure your type declaration will affect the variables in the macrolet form too, providind type checking, and enforcing the ability of the compiler to optimize code?

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Based on the CLHS, it appears to me that the vote went to the NO option. However, I don't see an explicit reference proving it, only that in the hyperlinks leading to the Issue page in the CLHS, the label :NO is appended, as the actual decision made. … Regardless, it is technically a “bug” in the ANSI standard. –  BRPocock Mar 7 '13 at 16:42
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In Common Lisp, let and symbol-macrolet shadow lexical bindings, and the (declare ((signed-byte 4) a)) is a bound declaration, so this is a bug if what SBCL is doing is to propagate the declaration to the shadowing binding.

This example might make it more clear (not a good practice, but it serves the purpose):

(let ((a 1))
  (declare (type fixnum a))
  (let ((a "1"))
    a))

The second a binding shadows the first, so the first becomes inaccessible within the scope of the second.

The second a doesn't have any type declaration, and it shouldn't inherit any from previous lexical bindings with the same name. Type declarations for lexical bindings are supposed to be applied to that specific binding only, no matter its name.

Thus, the output form of macroexpand-all should not have a the wrapping the access to the second a, at least one that clearly comes from the first binding. That is, a compiler may be sufficiently smart to see that the second a is always a string, so it could possibly declare it as a string.

The following examples just exercise the shadowing with both let and symbol-macrolet:

(let ((a 1))
  (declare (type fixnum a))
  (symbol-macrolet ((a "1"))
    a))

(symbol-macrolet ((a 1))
  (declare (type fixnum a))
  (let ((a "1"))
    a))

(symbol-macrolet ((a 1))
  (declare (type fixnum a))
  (symbol-macrolet ((a "1"))
    a))
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