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I have a file which has the number of .pdfs in my folder. I assign this number to a variable, fileNum like so:

fileNum=$(ls -l *.pdf | wc -l)

echo $fileNum returns this number without any problem. Now I need to use fileNum in a for loop and I am having problems with it.

My for loop is:

for i in {1..$fileNum}
do
 var=$(awk 'NR=='$i 'pdfs.file')

 gs \
 -sOutputFile="exgs_"$var \
 -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
 -sColorConversionStrategy=Gray \
 -dProcessColorModel=/DeviceGray \
 -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 \
 -dNOPAUSE \
 -dBATCH \
$var

done

The $ at the beginning of fileNum gives me an error message which is:

awk: line 1: syntax error at or near {

Things are fine when I actually use the number itself (which in this case is 17). Obviously, awk doesn't like this because of ... something.... I don't know what. What should I do about this?

I tried other forms such as $(fileNum) and filenum with the single quotes around it. Is it something to do with strings?

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first step: debugging: echo 'NR=='$i –  Karoly Horvath Aug 20 '12 at 16:13
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is because Bash will do the expansion on the braces before the variable. You need to use eval in this case so that Bash expands the variable first.

for i in $(eval echo {1..$fileNum})
do
 var=$(awk 'NR=='$i 'pdfs.file')

 gs \
 -sOutputFile="exgs_"$var \
 -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
 -sColorConversionStrategy=Gray \
 -dProcessColorModel=/DeviceGray \
 -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 \
 -dNOPAUSE \
 -dBATCH \
$var

done
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This worked. I don't really know what that means, however. –  drN Aug 20 '12 at 16:11
    
Take a look here. - tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-Guide/html/sect_03_04.html –  Buggabill Aug 20 '12 at 16:12
    
And here is a thread on linuxquestions.org that talks about it too. linuxquestions.org/questions/programming-9/… –  Buggabill Aug 20 '12 at 16:15
    
+1 for excellent Tip and useful links! –  JS웃 Aug 20 '12 at 18:28
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I'd use bash to read the file instead of running awk for every line.

while read -r file; do
    gs -sOutputFile="exgs_$file" \
       -sDEVICE=pdfwrite \
       -sColorConversionStrategy=Gray \
       -dProcessColorModel=/DeviceGray \
       -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 \
       -dNOPAUSE \
       -dBATCH \
       "$file"
done < pdfs.file

See also http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/001

Otherwise, for the general case where you want to iterate from 1 to n, I'd use a C-style for-loop.

n=10
for (( i=1; i <= n; i++)); do
   ...
done
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+1 this is the way to go –  chepner Aug 20 '12 at 17:31
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I would rather write:

for i in $(seq $fileNum)
do
  ....
done
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