Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

i have asked this question in serverfault but had no response for one week.

I have a dual Xeon E5522 2.26Ghz CPU (two quad-core CPUs in one motherboard). From what i know this is a NUMA architecture. The machine is running ubuntu server 12.04 with 3.2 kernel.

fdyn@fdyn-0:~/dev/numa_test$ uname -a
Linux fdyn-0 3.2.0-23-generic #36-Ubuntu SMP Tue Apr 10 20:39:51 UTC 2012 x86_64    x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

The kernel is supposed to be numa-aware

fdyn@fdyn-0:~$ grep NUMA=y /boot/config-3.2.0-23-generic 
CONFIG_NUMA=y
CONFIG_AMD_NUMA=y
CONFIG_X86_64_ACPI_NUMA=y
CONFIG_ACPI_NUMA=y

The problem is that "numactl" does not recognize the two nodes, it sees it as one big SMP machine.

~$ numactl --hardware
available: 1 nodes (0)
node 0 cpus: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
node 0 size: 32756 MB
node 0 free: 31036 MB
node distances:
node   0 
  0:  10 

I need the whole enviroment to be NUMA-aware so i can program a numa application then. ¿is it safe to ignore this? ¿what can be done so that numactl recognizes the 2 nodes?

share|improve this question
2  
Have you checked that NUMA is enabled in the BIOS? Some systems, such as the Mac Pro, disable it outright, with no way to enable it. Others only permit NUMA controls if enabled explicitly. Check with your hardware maker's documentation if it's definitely supported. –  pmdj Aug 20 '12 at 20:00
    
pmjordan, as you pointed out, this is indeed a mac-pro with ubuntu server installed. Really no way to enable it?? –  labotsirc Aug 20 '12 at 20:06
1  
as far as I know there isn't, though I don't own a Mac Pro and thus haven't tried. Try googling around for any Firmware or MSR (model specific register) hacks. I wouldn't get my hopes up, though. I assume Apple disables it because OSX doesn't support NUMA at all. –  pmdj Aug 20 '12 at 20:08
    
i will search for what you suggested, thanks! –  labotsirc Aug 20 '12 at 20:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As established in the comments, NUMA requires firmware support. Depending on the motherboard, this can mean you need to enable it in the BIOS setup tool.

Some hardware, notably Apple's Mac Pro, don't have a corresponding setting, and NUMA controls don't work on these machines. You might be able to find unofficial workarounds on the web - if you're lucky, Apple doesn't lock down the model-specific registers (MSR) for enabling it. You might be able to find MSR documentation on NUMA from intel and write to the relevant MSR using the msr.ko kernel module. By default, all memory accesses are interleaved across the two nodes.

share|improve this answer

you can fake numa nodes, i do it on single processor systems to test numa stuff

just pass and argument to kernel

numa=fake=2 will create 2 fake numa nodes

more info here: http://linux-hacks.blogspot.hk/2009/07/fake-numa-nodes-in-linux.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.