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I was reading http://www.docjar.com/html/api/java/util/LinkedList.java.html

When you declare a queue in Java

    Queue<Integer> queue = new LinkedList<Integer>();

What happens behind the scene ? because I see queue is an interface with just method signatures, and LinkedList doesn't directly implement it, so how does it override those methods (add(), peek(), poll(), offer(), and remove() ) and do the polymorphism like that ? I mean you can only access some certain methods but not all of them from LinkedList for example public void add(int index, E element) is no longer available as it makes the apparent type to Queue. Also didn't we need to cast it ?

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From the source code of the JDK:

public class LinkedList<E>
    extends AbstractSequentialList<E>
    implements List<E>, Deque<E>, Cloneable, java.io.Serializable
{

So LinkedList<E> doesn't directly implement Queue<E>, but it does implement Deque<E>, which extends Queue<E>:

public interface Deque<E> extends Queue<E> {

Threfore, LinkedList<E> inherits the abstract methods of Queue<E>.

The overriding methods are defined directly in LinkedList<E> - as usual.

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because I see queue is an interface with just method signatures, and LinkedList doesn't directly implement it

LinkedList does implement a Queue: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/LinkedList.html

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sorry i was reading it from docjar.com/html/api/java/util/LinkedList.java.html, where it doesn't implement Queue –  user1389813 Aug 20 '12 at 17:22
2  
Ah! LinkedList is implementing Deque which already extends Queue. –  Vikdor Aug 20 '12 at 17:26
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LinkedList does implement Queue. When an object is declared using an interface, the compiler treats it solely as an object of that type. however, since you cannot instantiate an interface, you need to instantiate it as a class that implements that interface. In this case, you will not be able to access some of LinkedList's methods, (push(), pop(), for example), because the compiler identifies queue as a Queue<Integer>. However, since it was instantiated as a LinkedList<Integer>, and can be casted easily to a LinkedList.

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sorry i was reading it from docjar.com/html/api/java/util/LinkedList.java.html, where it doesn't implement Queue –  user1389813 Aug 20 '12 at 17:22
    
PS: The assignment of LinkedList to the Queue interface is referred to as a "Widening Conversion". And push + pop are available on the Queue interface. It's List specific methods like get that are not, hence they are not available if you declare your variable as Queue instance, even though the underlying object might have those methods. –  Matt Aug 20 '12 at 17:32
    
@Matt try doing Queue<String> l = new LinkedList<String>(); l.push("hello");. it will not compile. push and pop are not available to Queue. They are methods implemented from the Stack interface (which LinkedList also implements). –  ewok Aug 20 '12 at 18:58
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