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I am trying to create my first Grails application and I am finding that many of the domain models need to be tied to the current user. For example, the comment created, has to be owned by the current user, the profile saved & edited must be for the current user, etc.

I started using generate controller and inserting the necessary code each time. However, often this is the only change I'm currently making to those controllers and its the same one each time. There must be a more elegant way that feels more "Graily".

The best idea I have come up so far is to name the field that has to be tied to the current user the exact same thing in every model (e.g. originatingUser) and then user a filter on before to override whatever is currently set as originatingUser to the current User stored in session.

Are there flaws in this approach? Is there something better?

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When you say entities, are you referring to domain objects or something different? –  Joseph Aug 20 '12 at 18:59
    
Yes, I mean domain objects. I was using Hibernate/JPA terminology. –  ArtB Aug 20 '12 at 20:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I started using generate controller and inserting the necessary code each time. However, often this is the only change I'm currently making to those controllers and its the same one each time. There must be a more elegant way that feels more "Graily".

Whatever you do, don't copy/paste code everywhere. That has nothing to do with Grails. Just don't do it. Every time you do it God kills a kitten.

It's hard to say without knowing more details about what you are doing, but I can see a few options

1) If you need to keep the entities out the database, once you load them you can put them in the session, along with the user. You can write code in a base controller class to access the session to retrieve the "current" model instance and then have all your controllers extend that controller. Or you could optionally put the session access code in some sort of helper.

2) The problem with 1 is it doesn't scale very well. If you have lots of objects you need to keep around, I wouldn't put them in the session. In this case you need to look at your design. Do you really need to keep the instances in the session? If you are checking if the user owns the object being modified, you can put that check in a service method. So if you check on edit, the first thing the service should do is check whether the user a) has the necessary role to modify the instance (if you are using security), and b) check the the user owns the instance (or otherwise can modify it).

EDIT BASED ON COMMENTS

First, if you are using the Spring Security plugin, you can get the current user easily.
If you go this route, you need to inject the security service into every controller/service where you want to get the user.

Second, if you are not, you should write a SessionHelper class, with static methods on it, to help keep all your session manipulation codez in one place (Spring Security also has a helper like this). If you do this, it's a one liner to get your current user whenever you want.

Finally, you should be getting the user in your service layer. Services should do all manipulation of persistent instances. If a user can only ever be attached to their own items, this also helps error that can arise by somehow getting the wrong user for a particular thing.

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My problem is that a lot of my domain models link to the user domain model. By default, when creating a model Grails presents a drop down list that lets you select to which User you want the model to be linked to. However, I would like to limit this to only being able to link to the User currently logged in (ie in session). –  ArtB Aug 21 '12 at 13:41
    
that's pretty common -- I still don't understand what the problem is. Give a particular use case where you think you need to keep the model instance in the session... –  hvgotcodes Aug 21 '12 at 13:44
    
(I edited the first comment since I fat-fingered submitted before I finished typing it). I'm storing the User object representing the currently logged in user in session. So, if I create a Comment domain model instance I want the User field on the Comment model to be populated with the user in session, ie I want the current user to "own" the comments they make. –  ArtB Aug 21 '12 at 13:47
    
So whats the problem? When you create the Comment instance, just set the user by grabbing the current user from the session... –  hvgotcodes Aug 21 '12 at 13:51
    
How do I "grab" without writing a custom controller? Is there a way to declare that in the model? Can I access the session variable from the Comment's constructor? –  ArtB Aug 21 '12 at 19:11

If it is literally the case that every object needs to be tied to a user, you could modify the Controller template to include the needed code.

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No, not every domain model, but a significant portion something like 20%. –  ArtB Aug 20 '12 at 20:00
    
And if the property is named the same in all your relevant domain classes then you can also modify the renderEditor.template with a special case for that property so it doesn't show the drop-down. –  Ian Roberts Aug 22 '12 at 12:44
    
@IanRoberts - Or better yet, use the Fields plugin and get even more control :) –  cdeszaq Aug 22 '12 at 13:35

Do you plan on rolling your own security mechanism? It might be more useful to look at the Spring Security plugin (or such). See if you can modify the Controller template to expedite the process. After those initial iterations though you really should try save some kittens.

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The best idea I have come up so far is to name the field that has to be tied to the current user the exact same thing in every model (e.g. originatingUser) and then user a filter on before to override whatever is currently set as originatingUser to the current User stored in session.

Are there flaws in this approach? Is there something better?

You can use another and more complex approach: AST transformations, annotations, etc. but that is a simple and effective approach.

By the way, are you using Spring Core Security plugin?

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