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I'm currently stuck on making the title screen to a game I've been planning.

The form loads and TMRopI (a timer) starts ticking, Increasing the opacity of the form, creating a fade in effect, and revealing a logo on the form. every time the timer ticks, an integer increases by 1 (or at least it's supposed to). A picturebox should become visible after the integer reaches 150 (the form is at full opacity when the integer equals 100) creating a pause before the picture is changed. The only problem is, it seems to be comepleteley ignoring my integer.

private: System::Void Form1_Load(System::Object^  sender, System::EventArgs^  e) {

             TMRopI->Enabled=true;
         }
private: System::Void TMRopI_Tick(System::Object^  sender, System::EventArgs^  e) {

             int num=0;
             num+=1;
             this->Opacity+=0.01;

             if (num >= 150)
                 PBXtitle->Visible=true;
         }
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I am coding this on a CLR windows form application, if that makes any difference. –  user1612252 Aug 20 '12 at 17:40
1  
This is not C++. –  AndreyT Aug 20 '12 at 17:45
    
As a side note: I will say it again: do not use c++-cli. You don't need it. It is more difficult than c++ and c# together. Select one of those. –  Lol4t0 Aug 20 '12 at 17:47
    
@AndreyT: True, but Microsoft calls it C++ anyway. –  Mike Seymour Aug 20 '12 at 18:19
    
@AndreyT - Woah, woah, what? what does that mean? I have been reading a book that teaches you how to code in C++ and I have been using this compiler the entire time, please elaborate. –  user1612252 Aug 20 '12 at 19:00
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Another option is to change the definition of num to static. However, making num a member variable of the class is the more C++ way to do it.

static int num=0;
num+=1;
this->Opacity+=0.01;

if (num >= 150)
    PBXtitle->Visible=true;

This way, num gets set to 0 on the first call to the function and it's value is saved between subsequent calls.

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int num=0 

sets num to 0 every time, does it not?

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+1 for spotting that. Anyway Mark's answer better explains what's the remedy for the problem. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Aug 20 '12 at 18:01
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As written, num will always be 1 in the TMRopI_Tick method. You should declare it in the calling method and pass it as a parameter by reference. Or, as @Matt points out in the comment, declare it as a member of the class.

Edit Your current declaration of num creates it as a local variable. It is "created" each time the method is called and "destroyed" as soon as the method ends. So every time the method is called it starts over at zero and then gets incremented to one. If TMRopI_Tick is called repeatedly inside a loop in another method, for example, you could define num in that calling method as a local variable. Then it would exist for the duration of that method. Then if you passed it to TMRopI_Tick (by reference), it would then be incremented and its scope (think of it as its "life") would exist throughout (and beyond) each call.

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Either that or declare it as a member variable of your class. –  Matt Davis Aug 20 '12 at 17:42
    
@MattDavis: Good point. I was just about to add that and your comment showed up. This site sometimes acts as if it reads one's mind. –  Mark Wilkins Aug 20 '12 at 17:44
    
@MattDavis"You should declare it in the calling method and pass it as a parameter by reference." "declare it as a member of the class." I feel so lost, I just read this thick book on how to program in C++11 using microsoft visual compiler and it never said anything about any of those things. please explain. –  user1612252 Aug 20 '12 at 19:06
    
I see, I think I understand now. thank you. –  user1612252 Aug 20 '12 at 19:38
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