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Obviously new to Linux serial programming.

If I use /dev/ttyS4 from minicom or termie, I can communicate with another PC via a null-modem cable. With the code here, when I run the program, I receive no characters from the remote pc, but instead see the input from the local keyboard. I'm guessing this is a simple configuration mistake, but I'm not seeing it.

Insights appreciated!

#include <stdio.h>   /* Standard input/output definitions */
#include <string.h>  /* String function definitions */
#include <unistd.h>  /* UNIX standard function definitions */
#include <fcntl.h>   /* File control definitions */
#include <errno.h>   /* Error number definitions */
#include <termios.h> /* POSIX terminal control definitions */



//const char NAK = 0x15;
char THE_PORT[] =  "/dev/ttyS4";
unsigned char m_messagebuf[255] ;

int main()
{
    int retval, fd, bwritten;   
    unsigned char m_recbuf[4];
    unsigned char m_sendbuf[73] ;       
    unsigned char haltchar = 0x1d;
    unsigned char c;
    char* p = 0;

    m_sendbuf[0] =  0x15;

    strcpy(m_messagebuf, "testing ");
    strcat(m_messagebuf, THE_PORT);
    printf("%s\n", m_messagebuf);
    sleep(1);

    //return(0);
    if (fd = open_port() < 0)
    {
        printf("oops...\n");
        return(0);
    }

    printf( "opened %s\n", THE_PORT);
    sleep(1);

    if (ConfigurePort(fd) < 0)
    {
        printf("oops...\n");
        return 0;
    }
    printf("configured %s\n", THE_PORT);
    sleep(1);

    while( 1)
    {
        printf("waiting for %s\n", THE_PORT);
        if ((retval = read(fd, &c, 1)) > 0)
        {
            printf("read %d from port : \n", retval);
            //m_recbuf[retval] = '0';
            printf("%c\n", c);

        }
        else
        {
            printf("Read 0 or  -1 from port (%d)\n", retval);
        }
        sleep(1);

        //bwritten = write(fd, (void *)&m_sendbuf, 1);
        //printf("wrote %d to port\n", bwritten);
    }       
    printf("Done.\n");
    close(fd);
    return 0;   

}


int ConfigurePort(int fd)
{   
    struct termios options;

    if ( tcgetattr(fd, &options) < 0)
    {

        perror(strcat("config_port: Unable to get attribs for ", THE_PORT));
        return -1;      
    }
    if (memset(&options, 0, sizeof(options)) < 0)
    {
        sprintf(m_messagebuf, "config_port: Unable to clear settings %s\n", THE_PORT);
        perror(m_messagebuf);
        return -1;
    }

    // 9600
    cfsetispeed(&options, B9600);
    cfsetospeed(&options, B9600);
    // N81
    options.c_cflag &= ~PARENB;
    options.c_cflag &= ~CSTOPB;
    options.c_cflag &= ~CSIZE;
    options.c_cflag |= CS8;
    // flow control OFF
    //options.c_cflag &= ~CNEW_RTSCTS;    
    // enable resd, keep owner
    options.c_cflag |= (CLOCAL | CREAD);

    // local options for raw input    
   options.c_lflag &= ~(ICANON | ECHO | ECHOE | ISIG);
    // raw output
    options.c_oflag &= ~OPOST;

    // raw input    
    options.c_iflag = INPCK | ISTRIP | IGNCR | IGNBRK;
    options.c_iflag &=  ~(IXON | IXOFF | IXANY);

    options.c_cc[VINTR]    = 0;     /* Ctrl-c */ 
    options.c_cc[VQUIT]    = 0;     /* Ctrl-\ */
    options.c_cc[VERASE]   = 0;     /* del */
    options.c_cc[VKILL]    = 0;     /* @ */
    options.c_cc[VEOF]     = 0;     /* Ctrl-d */
    options.c_cc[VSWTC]    = 0;     /* '\0' */
    options.c_cc[VSTART]   = 0;     /* Ctrl-q */ 
    options.c_cc[VSTOP]    = 0;     /* Ctrl-s */
    options.c_cc[VSUSP]    = 0;     /* Ctrl-z */
    options.c_cc[VEOL]     = 0;     /* '\0' */
    options.c_cc[VREPRINT] = 0;     /* Ctrl-r */
    options.c_cc[VDISCARD] = 0;     /* Ctrl-u */
    options.c_cc[VWERASE]  = 0;     /* Ctrl-w */
    options.c_cc[VLNEXT]   = 0;     /* Ctrl-v */
    options.c_cc[VEOL2]    = 0;     /* '\0' */

    options.c_cc[VMIN] = 1;     /* blocking read until 1 character arrives */
    options.c_cc[VTIME] = 0;        /* inter-character timer unused */

    //Set the new options for the port...      
    if (tcsetattr(fd, TCSAFLUSH, &options) < 0)
    {
        sprintf(m_messagebuf, "config_port: Unable to configure %s\n", THE_PORT);
        perror(m_messagebuf);
        return -1;
    }       
}

/*
 * Returns the file descriptor on success or -1 on error.
 */
int open_port(void)
{
      int fd; /* File descriptor for the port */

      fd = open(THE_PORT, O_RDWR | O_NOCTTY  | O_NDELAY | O_NONBLOCK); 
      if (fd == -1)
      {
            sprintf(m_messagebuf, "open_port: Unable to open %s\n", THE_PORT);
            perror(m_messagebuf);
            return -1;
      }       
     return (fd);
}
share|improve this question
1  
This is unrelated to the question, but I notice you have what looks like an access violation waiting to happen. The second strcat call (inside the perror call) will likely result in a crash if it were run. strcat expects a buffer that it can append to as the first parameter. The call as written passes a string literal, which will quite possibly result in a crash if appended to. –  Mark Wilkins Aug 20 '12 at 18:15
    
@mark yes this is horribly quick and dirty, just to see that I can actually talk to the port...Thanks. Haven't done plain C in many years, and am spoiled. I do mean to clean it all up. –  mickeyf Aug 20 '12 at 18:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
if (fd = open_port() < 0)

is equivalent to

if (fd = (open_port() < 0))

and < operator returns 0 or 1, this is not what you want for your file descriptor.

You probably wanted to do:

if ((fd = open_port()) < 0)

instead.

Another issue: your function ConfigurePort has no default return value at the end (the final }). No return value means it returns an indeterminate value and reading this value is undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
I will test for that, but why would I get that from "open("/dev/ttyS4", etc....", when ttyS4 is an actual com port ? (it is opening '3') –  mickeyf Aug 20 '12 at 18:18
    
"ConfigurePort has no default return value at the end." Yes, sloppy programming, but apparently not the problem, since it is not returning failure. Which is not to say that the values are correctly set, of course. –  mickeyf Aug 20 '12 at 18:23
    
@mickey you have an operator precedence issue see my edit. And for the undefined behavior it means your program can behave wrongly so you have to fix this. –  ouah Aug 20 '12 at 18:25
    
Thanks! that did it. As mentioned in another comment, I have gotten spoiled by using higher level languages for years. Obviously need to brush up my C attitude. Interesting though, that it apparently defaults to the console. I suppose that's logical from a certain point of view. –  mickeyf Aug 20 '12 at 18:30
    
@mickeyf You are welcome! –  ouah Aug 20 '12 at 18:37

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