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Here's my code:

public class DJ {
    static Thread djThread = new DJPlayThread();

    public static void play(){
        djThread.start();
    }
}

But once that thread is started, how can I run a method that is inside of the DJPlayThread class?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Do you actually mean "How do I define the code that will be executed by the new Thread?" – Affe Aug 20 '12 at 18:26
    
Can you explain what you're trying to do? I suspect you're not grasping how to use Threads, but without knowing what you're trying to accomplish it's hard to give you pointers. – Mark Peters Aug 20 '12 at 18:28
    
Yeah, sorry for the confusion. I have a method called stop() which is in DJPlayThread that I need to call from outside the thread class, if that makes any sense. – DannyF247 Aug 20 '12 at 18:37
    
The Thread class already has a stop method. – John Ericksen Aug 20 '12 at 18:41
    
@johncarl - That method is depreciated, and from what I've read, unsafe to use. I mean a method I made in the class called stop(). I can rename it to whatever though, like stopMusic(). – DannyF247 Aug 20 '12 at 18:42
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is a simple example of how to do what you ask:

public class ThreadControl {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        MyRunnable myRunnable = new MyRunnable("MyRunnable");
        Thread thread = new Thread(myRunnable);
        thread.setDaemon(true);
        thread.start();

        myRunnable.whoAmI();//call method from within thread

        try {
            Thread.sleep(6000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        }
        myRunnable.isStopped.set(true);//stop thread
    }

 static class MyRunnable implements Runnable {
        public String threadName;
        public AtomicBoolean isStopped=new AtomicBoolean(false);

        public MyRunnable() {
        }

        public MyRunnable(String threadName) {
            this.threadName = threadName;
        }

        public void run() {
            System.out.println("Thread started, threadName=" + this.threadName + ", hashCode="
                    + this.hashCode());

            while (!this.isStopped.get()) {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(3000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                }
                System.out.println("Thread looping, threadName=" + this.threadName + ", hashCode="
                        + this.hashCode());
            }
        }

        public void whoAmI() {
            System.out.println("whoAmI, threadName=" + this.threadName + ", hashCode="
                    + this.hashCode());
        }

    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Ahh thanks, I think this will work. Once I confirm I will accept :) – DannyF247 Aug 20 '12 at 18:46
    
Using a boolean this way may work in the trivial case, but will lead to subtle and hard to fix bugs when run with heavy load. – John Ericksen Aug 20 '12 at 18:57
    
@johncarl in all technicality it was a sample and the boolean had nothing to do with the question (used) it for neatness and for stopping the thread – David Kroukamp Aug 20 '12 at 19:02
2  
@DavidKroukamp I think it has everything to do with the question. We should provide complete examples. In this case, you just need to use an AtomicBoolean, make isStopped volitile or provider a synchronized getter/setter pair for thread safety. – John Ericksen Aug 20 '12 at 19:05
    
@johncarl You win :P... edited my post – David Kroukamp Aug 20 '12 at 19:06
public class DJ {
    private DJPlayThread djThread = new DJPlayThread();

    public void play() throws InterruptedException {
        djThread.start();

        Thread.sleep(10000);

        djThread.stopMusic();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        try{
            new DJ().play();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

public class DJPlayThread extends Thread{

    private AtomicBoolean running = new AtomicBoolean(true);

    @Override
    public void run() {
        while(running.get()){
            System.out.println("Playing Music");
            try {
                sleep(1000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    public void stopMusic(){
        //be careful about thread safety here
        running.set(false);
    }
}

Should print out:

Playing Music 
Playing Music 
Playing Music 
Playing Music 
Playing Music
Playing Music 
Playing Music 
Playing Music 
Playing Music 
Playing Music

Be very careful about the thread safety when exchanging information between threads. There are some weird things that happen when accessing and modifying variables across thread contexts.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 good idea with the Thread safety issue – David Kroukamp Aug 20 '12 at 19:07
1  
@DavidKroukamp Thanks David. Just finished re-reading Java Concurrency in Practice so Im attuned to thread safety. – John Ericksen Aug 20 '12 at 19:10

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