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This program reads strings of numbers from a txt file, converts them to integers, stores them in a vector, and then tries to output them in an organized fashion like so....

If txt file says:

7 5 5 7 3 117 5

The program outputs:

3
5   3
7   2
117

so if the number occurs more than once it outputs how many times that happens. Here is the code so far.

Solved: Final code:

#include "std_lib_facilities.h"

void print_numbers(const vector<int>& num)
{
 int counter = 1;
 for(int i = 0; i < num.size(); ++i)
 {
   if(i<num.size()-1 && num[i] == num[i+1]) ++counter;

   else if(i<num.size()-1 && num[i]!=num[i+1])
   {
        if(counter > 1)
        {
          cout << num[i] << '\t' << counter << endl;
          counter = 1;
        }
        else cout << num[i] << endl;
   }

   else if(i == num.size()-1)
   {
        if(counter >1) cout << num[i] << '\t' << counter << endl;
        else cout << num[i] << endl;
   }
  }
}



int str_to_int(string& s)
{
    stringstream ss(s);
    int num;
    ss >> num;
    return num;
}

int main()
{
    cout << "Enter file name.\n";
    string file;
    cin >> file;
    ifstream f(file.c_str(), ios::in);

    string num;
    vector<int> numbers;
    while(f>>num)
    {
        int number = str_to_int(num);
        numbers.push_back(number);
    }

    sort(numbers.begin(), numbers.end());
    print_numbers(numbers);

    keep_window_open();
}
share|improve this question
1  
No it isn't homework. Read profile. –  trikker Jul 30 '09 at 3:34
    
Your bug is if(i = 0). You want to use ==. Single equal sign is assignment. –  bstpierre Jul 30 '09 at 3:55
    
Gah, I always do that when I'm dealing with != as well. –  trikker Jul 30 '09 at 3:56
    
Why was this not closed? He did not even ask a question. –  Hooked Jul 30 '09 at 3:56
1  
Changing the question in this manner invalidates the original answers. It's probably best to accept an answer to the original and start a new question for a new problem. –  Adam Jul 30 '09 at 4:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about using a map, where the key is the number you're tracking and the value is the number of occurrences?

If you must use a vector, you've already got it sorted. So just keep track of the number you previously saw. If it is the same as the current number, increment the counter. Every time the number changes: print out the current number and the count, reset the count, set the last_seen number to the new number.

share|improve this answer
    
Reading backwards instead of reading ahead, of course. I'll post what I implemented, for some reason the program gets stuck. Must be an infinite loop in there somewhere. –  trikker Jul 30 '09 at 3:46
    
@bstpierre : Is a std::vector sorted by default? @ –  annunarcist Apr 11 at 5:12
    
No, it is not sorted. OP's code has sort(numbers.begin(), numbers.end()); –  bstpierre Apr 12 at 14:32

This program reads strings of numbers from a txt file, converts them to integers, stores them in a vector, and then tries to output them in an organized fashion like so....(emphasis added)

What is the point of this storage step? If you are reading the numbers from a file, then you already have them in order, ready to be processed (counted) one at time, as you encounter them.

However, I would need a way for it to know when it sees a new number.

I advise you to have a look at std::set or std::map. I expect either of these containers would do what you're looking for.

share|improve this answer

You could use a map of numbers to counters:

typedef map<int,unsigned int> CounterMap;
CounterMap counts;
for (int i = 0; i < numbers.size(); ++i)
{
   CounterMap::iterator i(counts.find(numbers[i]));
   if (i != counts.end()){
      i->second++;
   } else {
      counts[numbers[i]] = 1;
   }
}

... then iterate over the map to print results.

EDIT: As suggested by lazypython: if you have the TR1 extensions [wikipedia.org] available, unordered_map should have better performance...

typedef std::tr1::unordered_map<int,unsigned int> CounterMap;
CounterMap counts;
for (int i = 0; i < numbers.size(); ++i)
{
   CounterMap::iterator i(counts.find(numbers[i]));
   if (i != counts.end()){
      i->second++;
   } else {
      counts[numbers[i]] = 1;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I'd use a hashmap (or an unordered map, or whatever they call them in the tr1). You're will have O(nlgn) performance in the number of entries, while a hashmap will have O(nlgn) performance in the number of keys of the map, for any large application of this the number of entries will dwarf the number of keys. –  Alex Gaynor Jul 30 '09 at 4:01
    
btw, this does not require your vector to be sorted first. –  Adam Jul 30 '09 at 4:01
    
@lazypython good point. I was just thinking about the base stl release. I don't think a toy program like this will be concerned with speed, but I suppose it's best to learn the right techniques the first time. –  Adam Jul 30 '09 at 4:07

Std::count() fits the bill nicely.

std::vector<int>::const_iterator cur = numbers.begin();
std::vector<int>::const_iterator last = numbers.end();
while (cur != last) {
    unsigned cnt = std::count(cur, last, *cur);
    std::cout << *cur;
    if (cnt != 1) {
        std::cout << " " << c;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
    int saved = *cur;
    while (*cur == saved) {
        ++cur;
    }
}

Of course there are a bunch of other algorithms out there that will do the same job. Play with things like std::equal_range() in conjunction with std::distance() will do the job just as nicely.

share|improve this answer

Using a map is the practical solution. What you should do is to solve this problem :)

This is called frequency counter. So, you have a sorted vector and all what you have to do is to count successive equal numbers. In other words, you have to check each number with its successor.

for(size_t i = 0; i < numbers.size(); i++)
{
    size_t count = 1;

    size_t limit = numbers.size() - 1;
    while(i < limit  && numbers[i] == numbers[i+1])
    {
    	count++;
    	i++;
    }

    std::cout << numbers[i] << "\t" << count << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer

That was fun:

#include <map>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

struct IncrementMap
{
    IncrementMap(std::map<int,int>& m): m_map(m)    {}
        void operator()(int val) const
    {
        ++m_map[val];
    }
    std::map<int,int>& m_map;
};
struct SpecialPrint
{
    SpecialPrint(std::ostream& s):  m_str(s)    {}
    void operator()(std::map<int,int>::value_type const& value) const
    {
        m_str << value.first;
        if (value.second != 1)
        {
            m_str << "\t" << value.second;
        }
        m_str << "\n";
    }
    std::ostream&   m_str;
};
int main()
{
    std::fstream        x("Plop");
    std::map<int,int>   data;

    std::for_each(  std::istream_iterator<int>(x),
                     std::istream_iterator<int>(),
                     IncrementMap(data)
                );
    std::for_each(  data.begin(),
                    data.end(),
                    SpecialPrint(std::cout)
                );
}
share|improve this answer

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