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I want to allow a user to associate a zoom factor with a document and use it as a starting point when displaying that document inside a UIWebView. It seems, however, that webViewDidFinishLoad: only indicates the end of in-memory loading, not including rendering or layout. Here's sample code to demonstrate the problem:

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    UIWebView *webView = (UIWebView *)self.view;
    webView.delegate = self;
    webView.scalesPageToFit = YES;
}

- (void)viewDidAppear:(BOOL)animated {
    [super viewDidAppear:animated];

    NSString *urlString = [[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"Doc" ofType:@"pdf"];
    NSURL *file = [NSURL fileURLWithPath:urlString];
    [(UIWebView *)self.view loadRequest:[NSURLRequest requestWithURL:file]];
}

- (void)webViewDidFinishLoad:(UIWebView *)webView {
    if (!webView.isLoading) {
        [webView.scrollView setZoomScale:1.5 animated:YES];
    }
}

The call to setZoomScale: executes with no effect (i.e. the file is displayed with a zoom factor of 1.0), apparently because it happens before the scroll view is in some state where it can deal with it. If I change the final method above to what follows, everything works as I'd hoped.

- (void)delayedZoomMethod {
    [((UIWebView *)self.view).scrollView setZoomScale:1.5 animated:YES];
}

- (void)webViewDidFinishLoad:(UIWebView *)webView {
    [self performSelector:@selector(delayedZoomMethod) withObject:nil afterDelay:1.0];
}

This, of course, is a bad idea because the 1.0 delay is arbitrary, probably too long for the vast majority of cases, and will likely be too short under some unknown set of conditions.

The docs say, "Your application can access the scroll view if it wants to customize the scrolling behavior of the web view." Does anyone know of a notification, or property in the web view or its scroll view, that I could observe to be told when that statement becomes true?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

If you have control of the html code this may help. I've been able to have html events trigger objC methods in the following manner.

html event triggers javascript that writes a string to window.location the uiwebview then uses uiwebviewdelegate to receive the string with this function webView:shouldStartLoadWithRequest:navigationType:

It's kind of hacky.

But I don't think there is a way to know the web view has finished rendering, unless you wrote the html page and can put a js function in to execute at the end of the page.

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Thanks, but I'm hoping for something that works with the various data types that a UIWebView can load so it would have to be independent of the content. (HTML is about the least-frequent type I encounter, which is kind of why I showed an example with a PDF. :) ) –  Phillip Mills Aug 20 '12 at 19:12
    
I'm accepting this answer even though it only works for a subset of the data types because the answer that's been up-voted is completely wrong and the bounty time is almost over. :-) –  Phillip Mills Sep 1 '12 at 17:33

If you are using UIWebView to preview PDF files, then it may not be the best way. There is a QLPreViewController (from iOS 4.0) that is intended for this purpose. A Quick Look preview controller can display previews for the following items:

  • iWork documents
  • Microsoft Office documents (Office ‘97 and newer)
  • Rich Text Format (RTF) documents
  • PDF files
  • Images
  • Text files whose uniform type identifier (UTI) conforms to the public.text type (see Uniform Type Identifiers Reference)
  • Comma-separated value (csv) files
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Thanks, but I need the UIWebView's features. –  Phillip Mills Aug 25 '12 at 21:13

If I change the final method above to what follows, everything works as I'd hoped.

This, of course, is a bad idea because the 1.0 delay is arbitrary, probably too long for the vast majority of cases, and will likely be too short under some unknown set of conditions.

The docs say, "Your application can access the scroll view if it wants to customize the scrolling behavior of the web view."

- (void)webViewDidFinishLoad:(UIWebView *)webView {
    if (!webView.isLoading) //WEBDIDFINISHLOAD? {
        [webView.scrollView setZoomScale:1.5 animated:YES];
    }
}

look, the didFinishLoadMethod is called by an asynchronous notification from NSURLConnection, its not necessarily in the main thread (since your UI update is not working)

The performSelector..after delay method is fine. The delay doesnt even really mean anything, You are just jumping to the main thread to do your UI update and allowing the NSURLConnection notification to complete.

It probably wouldnt matter if you said afterDelay:0.0

This is a common situation in iOS and OSX, you have to figure out what threads are capable of updating the UI, GCD, NSOperationQueues, and background runLoops on created threads all complicate this.

You found your solution, but you need to know what it means. Do the call to performSelector on mainThread, set a short delay and its fixed.

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I'll take a look at threading but the idea that a 0.0 delay would work is wrong. That was the first thing I tried when I realized that the end of loading wasn't the same as end of view arrangement. –  Phillip Mills Aug 28 '12 at 10:44
    
You found your solution. –  deleted_user Aug 28 '12 at 10:47
    
When I examine the threads, I find that webViewDidFinishLoad: is already executing on the main thread, as expected. So, the same problem remains: a non-zero time is required with no currently-known way of determining what it should be and no event to indicate its completion. –  Phillip Mills Aug 28 '12 at 11:13

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