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I want to group by objectives in a collection which has data is below format.

[unique_id] => 649083802  
[objectives_compleeted_log_queue] => Array (  
)  
[objectives] => Array (      
        [37] => Array (  
            [is_completed] =>   
            [tasks] => Array (  
            [56] => Array (  
                [completed_count] => 0  
                [actions] => Array (  
                    [0] => 0  
                )  
            )  
        )  
    )  
    [96] => Array (  
        [is_completed] =>   
        [tasks] => Array (   
            [123] => Array (  
                [completed_count] => 0  
                [actions] => Array (  
                    [0] => 0  
                )  
            )  
        )  
    )  
    [97] => Array (  
        [is_completed] =>   
        [tasks] => Array (  
            [124] => Array (  
                [completed_count] => 0  
                [actions] => Array (  
                    [0] => 0  
                )  
            )  
        )  
    )

I need to group the unique_ids for each of the objectives (37, 96, 97... ) in the above example. Sorry very new to mongo db

share|improve this question

As a rule of thumb, using dynamic field names in your documents (e.g. objectives.37) will reduce your flexibility with indexing and queries. For starters, you won't be able to take advantage of multi-key indexes.

Nevertheless, we can use map/reduce to aggregate and count distinct ID's in your existing schema. In the interest of keeping the following examples concise, I shortened the field name to o and irrelevant data from the data fixtures.

<?php

$m = new Mongo();
$db = $m->test;

$db->foo->drop();
$db->foo->insert(['o' => [36 => [], 63 => [], 64 => []]]);
$db->foo->insert(['o' => [12 => [], 36 => [], 97 => []]]);

$result = $db->command([
  'mapreduce' => 'foo',
  'map' => new MongoCode('
    function() {
      for (var key in this.o) emit(key, { count: 1 });
    }
  '),
  'reduce' => new MongoCode('
    function(key, values) {
      var r = { count: 0 };
      values.forEach(function(v) { r.count += v.count; });
      return r;
    }
  '),
  'out' => ['inline' => 1]
]);

echo json_encode($result, JSON_PRETTY_PRINT);

Here, we're executing the map function across the entire collection, emitting each unique key within o objects that we process. With each emission, the initial value we emit is {count: 1}. After mapping, we have a huge pile of emissions consisting of a key and {count: 1} pair. Our reduce method is then called to process these intermediary results for distinct keys. Each object in the values argument follows the same structure (i.e. the same value we emitted earlier), and we are expected to return a single, reduced value of that same structure.

This script would yield the following output:

$ php mr.php 
{
    "results": [
        {
            "_id": "12",
            "value": {
                "count": 1
            }
        },
        {
            "_id": "36",
            "value": {
                "count": 2
            }
        },
        {
            "_id": "63",
            "value": {
                "count": 1
            }
        },
        {
            "_id": "64",
            "value": {
                "count": 1
            }
        },
        {
            "_id": "97",
            "value": {
                "count": 1
            }
        }
    ],
    "timeMillis": 17,
    "counts": {
        "input": 2,
        "emit": 6,
        "reduce": 1,
        "output": 5
    },
    "ok": 1
}

If you instead re-worked your schema so that objectives was an array of nested objects, we can make use of the aggregation framework in MongoDB 2.2+ to compute the same result with less effort:

<?php

$m = new Mongo();
$db = $m->test;

$db->foo->drop();
$db->foo->insert(['o' => [['id' => 36], ['id' => 63], ['id' => 64]]]);
$db->foo->insert(['o' => [['id' => 12], ['id' => 36], ['id' => 97]]]);

$result = $db->command([
  'aggregate' => 'foo',
  'pipeline' => [
    ['$project' => ['o' => 1]],
    ['$unwind' => '$o'],
    ['$group' => ['_id' => '$o.id', 'count' => ['$sum' => 1]]],
  ],
]);

echo json_encode($result, JSON_PRETTY_PRINT);

Here, we use the aggregation pipeline to do three operations in sequence:

  • Project the o field of scanned documents, which is similar to selecting specific output fields in a find query.
  • Unwind each o array we come across. Thinking of the pipeline as a stream of documents, we'll have two documents enter this step, each with three nested objects in their respective o fields. Unwinding will yield six documents to the next step, with each o array field replaced by an element of the array.
  • Group all documents in the stream at this point, using the o.id field as the grouping identifier and a summation as the group value for each element. For each grouped element, the count value field will be increased by one.

This script produces the output:

$ php af.php 
{
    "result": [
        {
            "_id": 12,
            "count": 1
        },
        {
            "_id": 63,
            "count": 1
        },
        {
            "_id": 97,
            "count": 1
        },
        {
            "_id": 64,
            "count": 1
        },
        {
            "_id": 36,
            "count": 2
        }
    ],
    "ok": 1
}
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