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Reading the Java online tutorial i haven't understand anything about wildcard capture. For example:

    import java.util.List;
    public class WildcardError {
     void foo(List<?> i) {
      i.set(0, i.get(0));
     }
    }

why the compiler can't retain the assignment safe? It knows that,by executing for instance, the method with an Integer List, it gets from i.get an Integer value. So it try to set an Integer value at index 0 to the same Integer list (i). So,what's wrong?Why write Wildcard helper?

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possible duplicate of Can't add value to the Java collection with wildcard generic type – Matt Ball Aug 20 '12 at 19:51
    
Erm, isn't it kind of inconsistent to vote to close the question and provide an answer? – meriton Aug 20 '12 at 20:05
    
It is not a duplicate (at least not of that question). – herman Aug 20 '12 at 23:04
    
I've seen questions about this exact example before, but can't seem to find them in search. – Paul Bellora Aug 20 '12 at 23:11
    
possible duplicate of Capturing wildcards in java generics – thecoop Nov 1 '13 at 12:52
up vote 12 down vote accepted

why the compiler can't retain the assignment safe?

The compiler doesn't know anything about the type of elements in List<?> i, by definition of ?. Wildcard does not mean "any type;" it means "some unknown type."

It knows that,by executing for instance, the method with an Integer List, it gets from i.get an Integer value.

That's true, but as I said above: the compiler can only know – at compile time, remember – that i.get(0) returns an Object, which is the upper bound of ?. But there's no guarantee that ? is at runtime Object, so there is no way for the compiler to know that i.set(0, i.get(0)) is a safe call. It's like writing this:

List<Foo> fooz = /* init */;
Object foo = fooz.get(0);
fooz.set(0, foo); // won't compile because foo is an object, not a Foo

More reading:

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4  
The answer of @meriton is more correct. The compiler doesn't have to know anything about the actual runtime type of the elements. If i was guaranteed to be the same instance in both cases, the (unknown) return type of the get method would be the same as the (unknown) 2nd argument type of the set method, so it would compile. However, as meriton pointed out, this guarantee is never assumed (even if i were local or final). – herman Aug 20 '12 at 23:01
    
Only in this special case - adding an element to the collection from whence it came - is that true. In general, you can never add to a wildcarded collection because of the PECS'd method signatures involved. – Matt Ball Aug 21 '12 at 2:20
    
Sure, but this was precisely the question. – herman Aug 27 '12 at 16:10

why the compiler can't retain the assignment safe? It knows that,by executing for instance, the method with an Integer List, it gets from i.get an Integer value. So it try to set an Integer value at index 0 to the same Integer list (i).

Put differently, why does the compiler not know that the two usages of the wildcard type List<?> in

i.set(0, i.get(0));

refer to the same actual type?

Well, that would require the compiler to know that i contains the same instance for both evaluations of the expression. Since i isn't even final, the compiler would have to check whether i could possibly have been assigned in between evaluating the two expressions. Such an analysis is only simple for local variables (for who knows whether an invoked method will update a particular field of a particular object?). This is quite a bit of additional complexity in the compiler for rarely manifesting benefits. I suppose that's why the designers of the Java programming language kept things simple by specifying that different uses of the same wildcard type have different captures.

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I also find this question hard to understand; splitting the single command into two commands helped me.

Below code is what actually happens in the background when the original method is inspected&compiled, the compiler makes its own local variable: the result of the i.get(0) call is placed in the register on the local variable stack.

And that is - for the understanding of this issue - the same as making a local variable which for convenience I have given the name element.

import java.util.List;
public class WildcardError {
 void foo(List<?> i) {
  Object element = i.get(0);  // command 1
  i.set(0, element);          // command 2
 }
}

When command 1 is inspected, it can only set the type of element to Object (--> upperbound concept, see Matt's answer), as it can not use ? as a variable type; the ? is only used for indicating that the generic type is unknown.

Variable types can only be real types or generic types, but since you don't use a generic type in this method like <T> for example, it is forced to use a real type. This forcing is done because of the following lines in the java specification (jls8, 18.2.1):

A constraint formula of the form ‹Expression → T› is reduced as follows:

[...]

– If the expression is a class instance creation expression or a method invocation expression, the constraint reduces to the bound set B3 which would be used to determine the expression's invocation type when targeting T, as defined in §18.5.2. (For a class instance creation expression, the corresponding "method" used for inference is defined in §15.9.3).

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