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I've been stuck at this problem fora few days. I'm obviously doing a very obvious mistake but I've been away from C++ for quite some time and just can't seem to find it.

I've got a base class such as:

#ifndef I_MESSAGE_LISTENER_H
#define I_MESSAGE_LISTENER_H

class MsgArg;

class IMessageListener
{
private:

public:
    IMessageListener(void);
    ~IMessageListener(void);

    virtual void RecieveMessage(MsgArg * arg) = 0;
};

#endif

And a derived class such as:

AI.h

#ifndef AI_H
#define AI_H

#include "IMessageListener.h"

class Paddle;
class Ball;
class MsgArg;

class AI : public IMessageListener
{
private:
    // Stuff

public:
    AI(void);
    ~AI(void);

    void ReceiveMessage(MsgArg* arg);
    void Init(Paddle * paddleRef, Ball * ballRef);
    void Update();
};    

#endif

And the AI.cpp:

#include "AI.h"
#include "MsgArg.h"

AI::AI(void)
{
    // Stuff
}

AI::~AI(void)
{
}

void AI::Init(Paddle * paddleRef, Ball * ballRef)
{
    // Stuff
}

void AI::Update()
{
    // Stuff
}

void AI::ReceiveMessage(MsgArg * arg)
{
}

And when I create an AI object:

AI * enemy = new AI();

I get the following error message:

1>d:\all\proyects\pfc\baddies\tests\rt-pong\rt-pong\rt-pong\game.cpp(92) : error C2259: 'AI' : cannot instantiate abstract class
1>        due to following members:
1>        'void IMessageListener::RecieveMessage(MsgArg *)' : is abstract
1>        d:\all\proyects\pfc\baddies\tests\rt-pong\rt-pong\rt-pong\imessagelistener.h(14) : see declaration of 'IMessageListener::RecieveMessage'

Any ideas on what it is I'm missing? I've got the function with the same signature overridden in the derived class, so I have no idea what's going on.

Thank you for your time.

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closed as too localized by rekire, blahdiblah, jadarnel27, gnat, cnicutar Mar 7 '13 at 6:28

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
There is a difference in the spelling of the function in the two classes. –  Bo Persson Aug 20 '12 at 20:09
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You made a typo: Receive and Recieve.

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Idem as to cnicutar. –  JaimeBarrachina Aug 20 '12 at 20:15
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Maybe it's the typo ?

virtual void RecieveMessage(MsgArg * arg) = 0;
        void ReceiveMessage(MsgArg* arg);
                ^^
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Thank you for that, I feel totally silly for wasting your time. –  JaimeBarrachina Aug 20 '12 at 20:15
1  
@user635663 Please accept the answer xaizek provided, he was first –  cnicutar Aug 20 '12 at 20:16
    
Thanks, yours showed up first. –  JaimeBarrachina Aug 20 '12 at 20:24
    
There's a campaign to clean up Stack Overflow by removing these typo-related questions, we could really use your help! Would you mind pitching in a little by casting a close vote on this question? –  Wesley Murch Mar 6 '13 at 22:44
    
@WesleyMurch Done. –  cnicutar Mar 7 '13 at 6:28
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This is known as pure virtual function.However it seems like typo(RecieveMessage) that violates this:-

C++ allows you to create a special kind of virtual function called a pure virtual function (or abstract function) that has no body at all! A pure virtual function simply acts as a placeholder that is meant to be redefined by derived classes(And typo masks it).

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It's just a typo in the virtual pure method of the base class. (RecieveMessage instead of ReceiveMessage). When the typo is in the method of the base class it's just a bit annoying (I guess it won't be more than a few minutes the next time). But keep using pure virtuals, because the other way around can be really bad : without the pure interface check, C++ would silently call the wrong method...

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You have a typo out there, so the compiler doesn't find a declaration in a derived class of the pure virtual function from the base class. Thus, the derived class becomes abstract as well, so you cannot instantiate it.

virtual void RecieveMessage(MsgArg * arg) = 0; // Re_CIE_veMessage

And in derived class you have:

void ReceiveMessage(MsgArg* arg); // Re_CEI_veMessage
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