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#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <ctime>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::clock_t start;
    double duration;    

    std::cout << "Starting std::cout test." << std::endl;
    start = std::clock();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    {
        std::cout << "Hello, World! (" << i << ")" << std::endl;
    }

    duration = (std::clock() - start) / (double) CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

    std::cout << "Ending std::cout test." << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Time taken: " << duration << std::endl;

    std::system("pause");

    std::cout << "Starting std::printf test." << std::endl;
    start = std::clock();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    {
        std::printf("Hello, World! (%i)\n", i);
        std::fflush(stdout);
    }

    duration = (std::clock() - start) / (double) CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

    std::cout << "Ending std::printf test." << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Time taken: " << duration << std::endl;

    system("pause");

    return 0;
}

Now, here are the times for the first five runs:

  • std::cout test: 1.125 s ; printf test: 0.195 s
  • std::cout test: 1.154 s ; printf test: 0.230 s
  • std::cout test: 1.142 s ; printf test: 0.216 s
  • std::cout test: 1.322 s ; printf test: 0.221 s
  • std::cout test: 1.108 s ; printf test: 0.232 s

As you can see, using printf and then fflushing takes about 5 times less time than using std::cout.

Although I did expect using std::cout's << operator to be perhaps a little slower (almost minimal) , I wasn't prepared for this huge difference. Am I making a fair test? If so, then what makes the first test so much slower than the second one, if they essentially do the exact same thing?

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2  
He did flush in the printf version too though, so that can't be it? –  Cubic Aug 20 '12 at 20:12
2  
The possible duplicate question does not answer my main question, **what makes** the first test so much slower than the second one... i.e why exactly is the printf faster? –  ApprenticeHacker Aug 20 '12 at 20:19
1  
There may not be a single correct answer other than the quality of the library implementation you're using. There have been similar questions such as this linked one. Read it and the related questions it links to. –  Blastfurnace Aug 20 '12 at 20:31
2  
Note that std::cout << "Hello, World! (" << i << ")" << std::endl; is 4 function calls, while printf is only one. Try doing printf 5 times, like with cout and see what happens. Then you'll realize how much of the performance fail is due to function calls, and how much due the library itself. –  Shahbaz Aug 20 '12 at 20:35
2  
Your current timings are meaningless as the std::cout is synced with stdout and thus does a lot of "extra" work to maintain synchronization. If you decouple them you will see a speedup (it is still slower) std::cout.sync_with_stdio(false); –  Loki Astari Aug 21 '12 at 15:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For a true apples-to-apples comparison, re-write your test so that the only thing changing between the test cases is the print function being used:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    const char* teststring = "Test output string\n";
    std::clock_t start;
    double duration;

    std::cout << "Starting std::cout test." << std::endl;
    start = std::clock();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        std::cout << teststring;
    /* Display timing results, code trimmed for brevity */

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
        std::printf(teststring);
        std::fflush(stdout);
    }
    /* Display timing results, code trimmed for brevity */
    return 0;
}

With that, you will be testing nothing but the differences between the printf and cout function calls. You won't incur any differences due to multiple << calls, etc. If you try this, I suspect that you'll get a much different result.

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Hmm, now it's only a difference of about 0.06 s. Guess that answers my question. –  ApprenticeHacker Aug 20 '12 at 20:50
3  
@bta, it seems to be an unfair test. For printf section you are flushing stdout after each iteration, but the std::cout code is not. Should probably add << std::flush(); to the std::cout section. –  paxos1977 Aug 20 '12 at 21:06
    
Add the following: std::cout.sync_with_stdio(false); –  Loki Astari Aug 20 '12 at 21:16
2  
This is not a useful comparison if the performance difference between cout and printf is due to the formatting of the number i to a string. –  joydeepb Oct 31 '13 at 18:46
    
@joydeepb- Probably not, but in this case my testing was showing that the multiple << operators were the likely culprit so I didn't bother showing sample code that tested for other things. You could, however, apply the same general principle (eliminate variables to simplify the problem) to solve the problem if the int-to-string conversion was the culprit. –  bta Nov 5 '13 at 0:40

Try this:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
#if defined(NOSYNC)
    std::cout.sync_with_stdio(false);
#endif

    std::cout << "Starting std::cout test." << std::endl;

    std::clock_t start = std::clock();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    {   
        std::cout << "Hello, World! (" << i << ")" << std::endl;
    }   

    clock_t mid = std::clock();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
    {   
        std::printf("Hello, World! (%i)\n", i); 
        std::fflush(stdout);
    }   

    std::clock_t end = std::clock();

    std::cout << "Time taken: P1 " << ((mid-start)*1.0/CLOCKS_PER_SEC) << std::endl;

    std::cout << "Time taken: P2 " << ((end-mid)*1.0/CLOCKS_PER_SEC) << std::endl;


    return 0;
}

Then I get:

> g++ -O3 t13.cpp
> ./a.out
# lots of lines deleted
Time taken: P1 0.002517
Time taken: P2 0.001872

> g++ -O3 t13.cpp -DNOSYNC   
> ./a.out
# lots of lines deleted
Time taken: P1 0.002398
Time taken: P2 0.001878

So the P2 times do not change.
But you get an improvement of the P1 times (ie std::cout) using std::cout.sync_with_stdio(false);. Becuase the code no longer tries to keep the two stream (std::cout stdout) synchronized. Which if you are writing pure C++ and only using std::cout not a problem.

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