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Having some difficulties solving an issue with an Amazon Kindle Fire which comes with Android 2.3.4, the crash is a SIGSERV and doesn't always reproduce.

The App itself is a native game, and will crash during a few points. It's hard to determine via log statements what exactly is causing the crash. I've been able to capture a game state in a save game to keep on restoring and running through a troublesome section.

The issue will only reproduce when Proguard is enabled, I've tried various configurations of Proguard disabling various features. The following is used in proguard and makes no difference to the problem:

-keepclasseswithmembers class *{
  native <methods>;
}

-keepclasseswithmembers class * { 
  *** *Callback(...);
}

-dontshrink
-dontoptimize
-dontpreverify
-keep class javax.** { *; }
-keep class java.** { *; }
-keep class org.** { *; }
-keep class android.** { *; }
-keep class com.** { *; }

Adding -dontobfuscate seems to remove the problem, however I can't 100% confirm due to the randomness of the effects.

The stack trace is as follows:

I/DEBUG   (23231): *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***
I/DEBUG   (23231): Build fingerprint: 'generic/blaze/blaze:2.3.4  GINGERBREAD/6.3.1_user_4107720:user/release-keys'
I/DEBUG   (23231): pid: 23238, tid: 23409  >>> mypackage <<<
I/DEBUG   (23231): signal 11 (SIGSEGV), code 1 (SEGV_MAPERR), fault addr 00000000
I/DEBUG   (23231):  r0 00000000  r1 0045ae68  r2 00000fc0  r3 006f003b
I/DEBUG   (23231):  r4 003b0059  r5 00040013  r6 fff60000  r7 0004fff5
I/DEBUG   (23231):  r8 00080009  r9 0046d350  10 00100000  fp 00000001
I/DEBUG   (23231):  ip 00120008  sp 48c2ee24  lr 00070013  pc afd0cfe0  cpsr 20000110
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d0  0000001900000110  d1  be94da8200000000
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d2  bfd180bc00000000  d3  3feec709dc3a0300
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d4  be86935e00000000  d5  bfd5a7f8c70233a6
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d6  458000009eb93fdb  d7  00000b9a00000b9a
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d8  00000000103a3c9d  d9  0000000000000000
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d10 0000000000000000  d11 0000000000000000
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d12 0000000000000000  d13 0000000000000000
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d14 0000000000000000  d15 0000000000000000
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d16 3fe7356a68b6af7e  d17 3ff0000000000000
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d18 be607fc1c458778e  d19 bfa7cc5f02a59422
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d20 4000000000000000  d21 3f114aff86ff44bc
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d22 bebbaaeb53350f0d  d23 bfd48eb6ede7d000
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d24 3e66376972bea4d0  d25 3fd193d7807f5e77
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d26 3ff4000000000000  d27 bfa7cc5f02a59424
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d28 c002b4ff18e04675  d29 bfd48eb70ee75389
I/DEBUG   (23231):  d30 3c6ad5a68fb54afb  d31 be607fc1c4800000
I/DEBUG   (23231):  scr 80000012
I/DEBUG   (23231): 
I/DEBUG   (23231):          #00  pc 0000cfe0  /system/lib/libc.so
I/DEBUG   (23231):          #01  lr 00070013  <unknown>
I/DEBUG   (23231): 
I/DEBUG   (23231): code around pc:
I/DEBUG   (23231): afd0cfc0 24c04001 24c05001 e2522020 ba000005 
I/DEBUG   (23231): afd0cfd0 f5d1f060 f5d1f080 e8b151f8 e2522020 
I/DEBUG   (23231): afd0cfe0 e8a051f8 aafffffa e2922020 0a00000c 
I/DEBUG   (23231): afd0cff0 e1b0ce02 28b10078 48b10180 28a00078 
I/DEBUG   (23231): afd0d000 48a00180 e1b0cf02 24913004 40d140b2 
I/DEBUG   (23231): 
I/DEBUG   (23231): code around lr:
I/DEBUG   (23231): 0006fff0 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 
I/DEBUG   (23231): 00070000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 
I/DEBUG   (23231): 00070010 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 
I/DEBUG   (23231): 00070020 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 
I/DEBUG   (23231): 00070030 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 
I/DEBUG   (23231): 
I/DEBUG   (23231): stack:
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ede4  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ede8  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2edec  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2edf0  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2edf4  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2edf8  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2edfc  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee00  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee04  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee08  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee0c  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee10  002275c4  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee14  00000001  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee18  df002777  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee1c  e3a070ad  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee20  48c2ee5c  
I/DEBUG   (23231): #00 48c2ee24  002275a0  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee28  00001000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee2c  48c2ee5c  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee30  00001000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee34  a811cda9  /system/lib/libutils.so
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee38  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee3c  81004f45  /system/lib/libOpenSLES.so
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee40  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee44  002275a0  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee48  00227eb8  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee4c  00000800  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee50  48c2ee5c  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee54  a903181b  /system/lib/libmedia.so
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee58  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee5c  00000000  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee60  00000001  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee64  00000001  
I/DEBUG   (23231):     48c2ee68  00000800 

To get debug information I've enabled proguard into debug mode and enabled debug symbols and run gdb. Through gdb when the crash occurs the backtrace is trashed as the return pointer on the frame has been overwritten.

Using addr2line, the memory reference shows that it's crashed in memcpy. A bit of digging with gdb shows it's the first argument of memcpy being passed a NULL pointer.

Have tried many things to try to find the root of this problem, even tried to replace the memcpy function with my own bespoke one to catch the issue red handed. However was running into a few issues with the redirecting under ARM pointer math.

The return pointer on the stack, not the lr register seems to point to JITed code. It's not my native code calling memcpy.

On inspecting the stack manually, nothing seems to point to any of my native code.

Any suggestions on getting more useful information to pinpoint the issue or even on doing the replacement function with memcpy? Or getting a useful dalvik stack trace from a native crash.

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1 Answer 1

I had the same problem. On Android 3.x worked just fine and then the same thing you are showing happened on Android 4. Just use memmove, whenever you want to use memcpy.

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I would say this problem can be exhibited by multiple problems, ours was solved by keeping out audio files at the same hertz. As on the Kindle fire (2.3.1) it couldn't cope with an audio driver changing hertz. –  Peter Brooks Sep 24 '12 at 15:13

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