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Scenario

Step 1: Init the location manager to read GPS locations every 50 meters:

locationManager.requestLocationUpdates(LocationManager.GPS_PROVIDER, 0, 50, locationListenerGps);

Step 2: each time a location is read:

@Override
    public void onLocationChanged(Location location) {
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                sendLocation(location);
            }
        }).start();
    }

Step 3: on sendLocation there are a few things I do:

  • query the local sqlite database for failed to send records
  • if any, send them together together with the current location to a web service
  • if none, send only the current location
  • if sending failed (mostly because of data connectivity), insert location in database for future readings
  • if sending succeed, delete all rows from the database

The problem

All this is done in background in a service. For each sendLocation call I make a new thread. While connectivity is ok, everything works fine. But, when sending fails and the user is driving, the location read happens very often and there are big chances that there are 2-3 threads all trying to send the same unsent locations. If Thread1 receives the list and tries to send it, Thread2 and Thread3 should not be able to read it and try to send it as Thread1 may send it successfully. How can I prevent this from happening ? How can I make sure Thread2 does not read the list ?

From what I am thinking now, I could add a new field in the table "processing" and for all the rows retrieved for sending, update the field to true. In this case Thread2 will only get the processing=false rows. Is this a solution ? Any other recommendations ? I still believe that there is a slight change for Thread2 to get the data, while Thread1 is updating processing... Thanks.

Later edit: Extra thoughts and ideas I have tried this approach

private ExecutorService threadPool;

@Override
public void onCreate() {
    scheduleTaskExecutor = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
    threadPool = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

     //also need to send location every 60 seconds if no other location was read
    scheduleTaskExecutor.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
              sendLocation(lastLocation);
                  }
    }, 60, 60, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
}


@Override
    public void onLocationChanged(Location location) {
         threadPool.execute(new Runnable() {
         @Override
         public void run() {
             sendLocation(location);
         }
     });
    }

@Override
public void onDestroy() {
    threadPool.shutdownNow();
}

From what I read, this threadPool should force threads to execute one after another, right ? (even I do have a feeling I misunderstood its purpose) If so, what happens if I get no connectivity for an hour ? For each location read, a new thread is added... but how long does this thread last ? I am concern what happens if the user is driving really fast, I could get locations read every 1-2 seconds, would this mechanism hold my web access in a queue, one thread after another ?

In another order of thoughts, what if onCreate method of the service I make a new thread. Something like:

 @Override
    public void onCreate() {
            new Thread(new Runnable() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                     startLocationListener();
                }
            }).start();
        }

and in startLocationListener() I start GPS location read. Will onLocationChanged be executed on this thread and won't interfere with my UI thread ?

Would it be wiser to use a Service that runs in its own thread ? So I won't have to worry about threading ?

Using the current approach, the app does the job but there is something wrong happening, randomly and can't figure out the reason: one of my activities binds to the service to receive updates, I carefully unbind it when the app gets onPause... but sometimes the service keeps running, as I can see its notification icon displayed. I will investigate this more, but I need to settle a strong/reliable way of handling location reading and sending.

Later later edit

How about this approach:

private ExecutorService scheduleTaskExecutor;

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        scheduleTaskExecutor = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();

         //also need to send location every 60 seconds if no other location was read
        scheduleTaskExecutor.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                  sendLocation(lastLocation);
                      }
        }, 60, 60, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
    }


    @Override
        public void onLocationChanged(Location location) {
             scheduleTaskExecutor.submit(new Runnable() {
             @Override
             public void run() {
                 sendLocation(location);
             }
         });
        }

    @Override
    public void onDestroy() {
        scheduleTaskExecutor.shutdownNow();
    }
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

So let me get this straight: you want to send locations one after the other from a background thread. A simple scheme to achieve this would be (similar to your edited code, but I don't see the reason for ScheduledExecutor):

private ExecutorService exec;

@Override
public void onCreate() {
    exec = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
}


@Override
public void onLocationChanged(Location location) {
    exec.submit(new Runnable() {
         @Override
         public void run() {
             sendLocation(location);
         }
    });
}

@Override
public void onDestroy() {
    exec.shutdownNow();
}

What this does under the hood is basically to create a background thread and a queue of tasks. Every time a location is read a new task is put into the queue. The thread continuously polls the queue and executes the tasks in order.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah yes, I see the submit rather than exec from my code. I will try this approach. The ScheduledExecutor was putted by mistake, I fixed the code. However, I do use the ScheduledExecutor like this: if there is no location send in the last 60 seconds, resend the last read location. This allows the server to know which users are staying in one position but still use the app. This is a requirement. How could I, every 60 seconds add a new threat to exec queue ? Remove the ScheduleExecutor and use a timer ? –  Alin Sep 4 '12 at 20:28
    
@Alin: Yes you can use a ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor if you want to also have a task executed periodically in addition to the normal tasks sent with submit. –  Tudor Sep 4 '12 at 20:43
    
But please correct me if I'm wrong scheduleTaskExecutor.scheduleAtFixedRate spawns a new thread to be executed every x time units I want. I'd like to simply add a new thread to exec so my queue has all the threads in right order. –  Alin Sep 5 '12 at 18:13
    
@Alin: If you use ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor you have one thread and one queue of tasks. You can submit tasks and they will be executed in order. If additionally you use the scheduleAtFixedRate method it will put another task in the queue that executes when the timeout elapses. –  Tudor Sep 5 '12 at 18:47
    
I have added scheduleAtFixedRate code above in my example. I think I finally start to understand. So I could use scheduleTaskExecutor by init it to run at every 60 seconds and also, on a new location read, use it like scheduleTaskExecutor.submit . In this way, all my threads will be in a queue, either being on timer or location read. Is this correct ? Is enough when I stop the service to use a scheduleTaskExecutor.shutdownNow(); command to stop current running thread and clear the queue ? Thank you a lot for your help. –  Alin Sep 5 '12 at 19:14

For each sendLocation call I make a new thread.

Why?

But, when sending fails and the user is driving, the location read happens very often and there are big chances that there are 2-3 threads all trying to send the same unsent locations.

This is why I asked "Why?" above.

If Thread1 receives the list and tries to send it, Thread2 and Thread3 should not be able to read it and try to send it as Thread1 may send it successfully. How can I prevent this from happening ? How can I make sure Thread2 does not read the list ?

IMHO, by not having Thread2 and Thread3 in the first place. Use a single thread at a time, that sends all unsent data. That is probably a long-lived thread, working off of a work queue (coupled with some sort of timer mechanism to handle the case where you failed to update before and wish to make sure you try again after X period of time, if no other events forced you to try sooner than that). I don't see why you would need more than that to achieve your aims.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you CommonsWare for your answer. I have both an app and a service which is binded to the app. From what I know, the service runs in the same thread as the main app, so having web requests from the service, might block the UI of the app. There are places in my app where I show the current position on a MapView for instance. Your answer makes sense, but how do you suggest I should implement this long running thread in my service to have the UI still running smooth ? –  Alin Aug 21 '12 at 4:59
    
@Alin: "From what I know, the service runs in the same thread as the main app, so having web requests from the service, might block the UI of the app." -- which is why your service forks a thread. "how do you suggest I should implement this long running thread in my service to have the UI still running smooth ?" -- using the same Java threading that Java developers have used in the past decade or so, such as a LinkedBlockingQueue with a thread monitoring it for work to do. –  CommonsWare Aug 21 '12 at 10:49
    
I've never used LinkedBlockingQueue before, I will take a look at it. Thanks. I was thinking at another solution which might work: have a boolean variable in the service, isProcessingDB which turns true when thread1 starts using it, and gets false when processing is done. This would make sure Thread2 will not access the data is isPorcessDB is true.But a short question: if I say on onCreate() of the service newThread(...run(){startListeningForLocation()} does it mean that all the processing onLocationChanged and web call is done in this thread ? This excludes the need of other threads? –  Alin Aug 21 '12 at 12:13
    
A small sample code would help me understand what you mean. –  Alin Aug 21 '12 at 12:13

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