Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this question positioning text of anchor within a div and given the same code which I repeat here:

HTML Markup

<div id="header"> 
    <a href="cattle.html" class="current">Cattle Farms</a> 
</div> 

CSS Style

#header a { 
    width: 100%; 
    height: 100%; 
    display: block; 
    font-size: 25px; 
} 

Answer

div#header a { 
    width: 100%; 
    height: 100%; 
    display: block; 
    text-indent: 20px; 
    line-height: 350px; 
} 

Fiddle

My question is why does not the line-height make the a break out of the div

share|improve this question
    
@Paul Calabro: Maybe others can come up with a better insight. –  Jawad Aug 20 '12 at 20:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It does break out of the div. If you put a span inside the a tag and give it a display of inline-block (and a background-color so you can see it) you'll realize it does. Remember the span inherits the line-height. Take a look:

http://jsfiddle.net/fnX9n/6/

Give the a a bigger line-height and without anything else you'll also be able to realize it is breaking out of the div: http://jsfiddle.net/fnX9n/7/

share|improve this answer
    
Look it up in FF with Firebug with no span element. The Firebug shows that the a element is contained with in the div#header even if i give line-height: 500px; –  Jawad Aug 20 '12 at 21:39
    
jsfiddle.net/fnX9n/8 –  Jawad Aug 20 '12 at 21:41
    
Its just the text that moves. Not the anchor. –  Jawad Aug 20 '12 at 21:41
    
I wasn't warned about your comments. I'm too tired too answer now. I'll get back tomorrow. Sorry... But, basically, since you set a specific height on the a element (with a display of block), it's no longer the line-height that determines it's height - it's the... well, the height. The line-height still takes effect, it just no longer determines the elements height, since you chose to set it yourself when you set the height. –  JOPLOmacedo Aug 21 '12 at 0:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.