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I found this lovely blog post on creating a generic IEqualityComparer that lets you specify a lambda expression for equality testing. This is really helpful in building fluent join expressions with the standard query operators, as in the following example (valid, self-contained LINQPad script; just copy-paste it!):

void Main()
{
    var outers = new [] {
        Tuple.Create("a", "b"),
        Tuple.Create("a", "c")
    };

    var inners = new [] {
        Tuple.Create("b", "c"),
        Tuple.Create("a", "c")
    };

    var j2s = outers
    .Join(
        inners, 
        outer => outer,
        inner => inner,
        (outer, inner) => Tuple.Create(outer, inner),
        new GenericEqualityComparer<Tuple<string, string>>(
            (u, v) => (u.Item1 == v.Item1 && u.Item2 == v.Item2))
    )
    .Dump("Using Custom Equality Comparer")
    ;
}

public sealed class GenericEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    internal Func<T, T, bool> EqualsFunc {get; private set;}
    internal Func<T, int> GetHashCodeFunc {get; private set;}

    public GenericEqualityComparer(
        Func<T, T, bool> equalsFunc,
        Func<T, int> getHashCodeFunc = null)
    {
        if (equalsFunc == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("equalsFunc");
        if (getHashCodeFunc == null)
            getHashCodeFunc = (t => 0x1BADF00D);

        EqualsFunc = equalsFunc;
        GetHashCodeFunc = getHashCodeFunc;
    }

    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return EqualsFunc(x, y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        return GetHashCodeFunc(obj);
    }
}

The question is how can I make this thing use type inference? The compiler forces met to state, explicitly, the type arguments to the constructor GenericEqualityComparer<Tuple<string, string>>, even though I intuitively thought the compiler should be able to figure it out. If I leave out the explicit type argument, I get

Using the generic type 'UserQuery.GenericEqualityComparer<T>' requires 1 type arguments

Without type inference, it seems a broader scenario, say using anonymous type as in the following, it hopeless:

var j3s = outers
.Join(
    inners,
    outer => new {Left = outer.Item1, Right = outer.Item2},
    inner => new {X = inner.Item1, Y = inner.Item2},
    (outer, inner) => Tuple.Create(outer, inner),
    new GenericEqualityComparer<????????????????>(
        (u, v) => (u.Left == v.X && u.Right == v.Y)
    )
)
.Dump("Using type inference?")
;
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1 Answer 1

Create a static factory in a non-generic class:

public static GenericEqualityComparer<T> Create<T>(
    T prototype,
    Func<T, T, bool> equalsFunc,
    Func<T, int> getHashCodeFunc = null) {
       return new GenericEqualityComparer<T>(equalsFunc, getHashCodeFunc);
    }

The first parameter is ignored. It is a way to let the compiler infer T, even if T is anonymous. It is a hack.

Use it like this:

UserQuery.GenericEqualityComparer.Create(new {X = 0, Y = 0}, (u, v) => ...)

This allows to infer u and v. I repeat: This is a hack.

Notice, that the call to Join can only work, if both key selectors return the same anonymous type. An equality comparer can only compare two items of the same type.

share|improve this answer
    
Seems that your proposal just moved to problem to a different place. I put your method in a public static class GenericEqualityComparer, but the use-case Join expression now says The type arguments for method 'UserQuery.GenericEqualityComparer.Create<T>(System.Func<T,T,bool>, System.Func<T,int>)' cannot be inferred from the usage. Try specifying the type arguments explicitly. –  Reb.Cabin Aug 20 '12 at 22:15
    
Hm, now that I look closer at the code (and at what I wrote) I conclude that there is no proper solution because type inference proceeds from the leaves to the root: All arguments, including the comparer, must be resolved before the join is resolved. This means that the join cannot backpropagate the type information.; There is a hack solution though, which I posted. –  usr Aug 20 '12 at 22:56
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